"Girl power!"

The relationship between women's autonomy and children's immunization coverage in ethiopia

Jane Ebot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Although immunizations are efficient and cost effective methods of reducing child mortality, worldwide, approximately 2 million children die yearly of vaccine-preventable diseases. Researchers and health organizations have detailed information on the positive relationship between women's autonomy and children's health outcomes in developing countries. Methods: This study investigates the links between women's household autonomy and children's immunization status using data from a nationally representative sample of children aged 12-30 months (N = 2941) from the 2011 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey. Results: The results showed that women's socioeconomic status and household autonomy were significantly associated with children's immunization status. Conclusion: Overall, the implications of this study align with those of the Millennium Development Goal #3: Improvements in women's household autonomy are linked to more positive child health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number18
JournalJournal of Health, Population and Nutrition
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 18 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ethiopia
Immunization
immunization
households
Child Mortality
Women's Rights
Women's Health
Social Class
Developing Countries
Vaccines
Research Personnel
Demography
Organizations
Costs and Cost Analysis
socioeconomic status
Power (Psychology)
Health
developing countries
demographic statistics
researchers

Keywords

  • Children
  • Ethiopia
  • Household autonomy and health
  • Immunization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

"Girl power!" : The relationship between women's autonomy and children's immunization coverage in ethiopia. / Ebot, Jane.

In: Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition, Vol. 33, No. 1, 18, 18.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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