Getting physical with your chemistry: Mechanically investigating local structure and properties of surfaces with the atomic force microscope

William F. Heinz, Jan H. Hoh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool for investigating nanoscale structures, dynamics, and forces at interfaces. AFM has dramatically matured in the almost 20-year history of the instrument. Today, AFMs are sufficiently robust and accessible that they are finding their way into undergraduate science curricula. This paper discusses the current state of the art of AFM in terms of imaging, force measurement, and sample manipulation and its application to physical chemistry. Biological systems are used as examples for how the AFM can be used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)695-703
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Chemical Education
Volume82
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Education

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