Geographic variations in mortality from motor vehicle crashes

S. P. Baker, R. A. Whitfield, B. O'Neill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using a new technique to study the mortality associated with motor vehicle crashes, we calculated population-based death rates of occupants of motor vehicles during the period 1979 through 1981 and mapped them according to county for the 48 contiguous states of the United States. Mortality was highest in counties of low population density (r = -0.57; P <0.0001) and was also inversely correlated with per capita income (r = -0.23; P <0.0001). Death rates varied more than 100-fold; for example, Esmeralda County, Nevada, with 0.2 residents per square mile (2.6 km2), had a death rate of 558 per 100,000 population, as compared with Manhattan, New York, with 64,000 residents per square mile and a death rate of 2.5 per 100,000. Differences in road characteristics, travel speeds, seat-belt use, types of vehicles, and availability of emergency care may have been major contributors to these relations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1384-1387
Number of pages4
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume316
Issue number22
StatePublished - 1987

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Motor Vehicles
Mortality
Seat Belts
Emergency Medical Services
Population Density
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Baker, S. P., Whitfield, R. A., & O'Neill, B. (1987). Geographic variations in mortality from motor vehicle crashes. New England Journal of Medicine, 316(22), 1384-1387.

Geographic variations in mortality from motor vehicle crashes. / Baker, S. P.; Whitfield, R. A.; O'Neill, B.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 316, No. 22, 1987, p. 1384-1387.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baker, SP, Whitfield, RA & O'Neill, B 1987, 'Geographic variations in mortality from motor vehicle crashes', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 316, no. 22, pp. 1384-1387.
Baker SP, Whitfield RA, O'Neill B. Geographic variations in mortality from motor vehicle crashes. New England Journal of Medicine. 1987;316(22):1384-1387.
Baker, S. P. ; Whitfield, R. A. ; O'Neill, B. / Geographic variations in mortality from motor vehicle crashes. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1987 ; Vol. 316, No. 22. pp. 1384-1387.
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