Geographic differences in housing prices and the well-being of children and parents

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article contributes to the ongoing discussion about whether the official poverty measure should be adjusted for geographic differences in the cost of living (COL). Part of the support for spatial COL adjustments is the concern that the reduced purchasing power of the poor in higher-priced areas could jeopardize the health and well-being of children and parents. The results of this analysis of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and its Child Development Supplement do not support this view. We find that children growing up in higher-priced housing markets appear to fare no worse than those in lower-priced markets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-146
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Urban Affairs
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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cost of living
parents
well-being
housing
child development
housing market
cost
poverty
purchasing power
income
supplement
market
pricing
health
price
analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Geographic differences in housing prices and the well-being of children and parents. / Harkness, Joseph; Newman, Sandra J; Holupka, Charles Scott.

In: Journal of Urban Affairs, Vol. 31, No. 2, 2009, p. 123-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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