Genotypic resistance in HIV-1-infected patients with persistently detectable low-level viremia while receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

Richard E. Nettles, Tara L. Kieffer, Rachel P. Simmons, Joseph Cofrancesco, Richard D Moore, Joel E. Gallant, Deborah Persaud, Robert F Siliciano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. Technical limitations in the sensitivity of commercial genotyping methods may prevent clinicians from determining whether drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is present in patients with low-level viremia. We performed ultrasensitive HIV-1 genotyping for patients with persistent plasma virus loads of 50-400 copies/mL to better define the prevalence of drug resistance and the most common resistance mutations during persistently detectable low-level viremia. Methods. Genotyping of HIV-1 was performed with an ultrasensitive clonal genotyping method. Results. We studied 21 patients who had persistent, detectable, low-level viremia for a median of 11 months. Nine (43%) of 21 patients had HIV-1 isolates with significant resistance mutations. The most common mutations were M184V, K65R, and M41L/T215Y. Conclusions. The finding that clinically significant resistance mutations were present in some but not all patients with persistent viremia (range, 50-400 copies/mL) highlights the need to improve the sensitivity of current clinical assays for detection of drug resistance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1030-1037
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume39
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2004

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Viremia
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
HIV-1
Mutation
Drug Resistance
Viruses
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Genotypic resistance in HIV-1-infected patients with persistently detectable low-level viremia while receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. / Nettles, Richard E.; Kieffer, Tara L.; Simmons, Rachel P.; Cofrancesco, Joseph; Moore, Richard D; Gallant, Joel E.; Persaud, Deborah; Siliciano, Robert F.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 39, No. 7, 01.10.2004, p. 1030-1037.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background. Technical limitations in the sensitivity of commercial genotyping methods may prevent clinicians from determining whether drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is present in patients with low-level viremia. We performed ultrasensitive HIV-1 genotyping for patients with persistent plasma virus loads of 50-400 copies/mL to better define the prevalence of drug resistance and the most common resistance mutations during persistently detectable low-level viremia. Methods. Genotyping of HIV-1 was performed with an ultrasensitive clonal genotyping method. Results. We studied 21 patients who had persistent, detectable, low-level viremia for a median of 11 months. Nine (43{\%}) of 21 patients had HIV-1 isolates with significant resistance mutations. The most common mutations were M184V, K65R, and M41L/T215Y. Conclusions. The finding that clinically significant resistance mutations were present in some but not all patients with persistent viremia (range, 50-400 copies/mL) highlights the need to improve the sensitivity of current clinical assays for detection of drug resistance.",
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AU - Simmons, Rachel P.

AU - Cofrancesco, Joseph

AU - Moore, Richard D

AU - Gallant, Joel E.

AU - Persaud, Deborah

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