Genomics and the chemotherapy of leprosy

Jacques H. Grosset, Stewart T. Cole, M. Jo Colston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The information deduced from the genome sequence of Mycobacterium leprae is of immense value for the chemotherapy of leprosy. Knowing the complete set of genes, enzymes and proteins allows us to understand why some drugs are without effect whereas others are fully active. It may also enable better use to be made of existing drugs, such as β-lactams, and opens new avenues for the development of novel compounds. M. leprae is relatively susceptible to a wide range of drags, unlike the highly related tubercle bacillus, and several new multidrug regimens are in clinical trials. Genomics provides a number of possible explanations for this broader susceptibility as some of the genes encoding enzymes involved in antibiotic inactivation have decayed whereas the number of transporters available to contribute to drug efflux is considerably lower than in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Several leads for new drag targets have been uncovered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-440
Number of pages12
JournalLeprosy Review
Volume72
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Leprosy
Genomics
Mycobacterium leprae
Drug Therapy
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Lactams
Enzymes
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Bacillus
Clinical Trials
Genome
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Genes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Grosset, J. H., Cole, S. T., & Colston, M. J. (2001). Genomics and the chemotherapy of leprosy. Leprosy Review, 72(4), 429-440.

Genomics and the chemotherapy of leprosy. / Grosset, Jacques H.; Cole, Stewart T.; Colston, M. Jo.

In: Leprosy Review, Vol. 72, No. 4, 2001, p. 429-440.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grosset, JH, Cole, ST & Colston, MJ 2001, 'Genomics and the chemotherapy of leprosy', Leprosy Review, vol. 72, no. 4, pp. 429-440.
Grosset JH, Cole ST, Colston MJ. Genomics and the chemotherapy of leprosy. Leprosy Review. 2001;72(4):429-440.
Grosset, Jacques H. ; Cole, Stewart T. ; Colston, M. Jo. / Genomics and the chemotherapy of leprosy. In: Leprosy Review. 2001 ; Vol. 72, No. 4. pp. 429-440.
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