Genome-wide association study of neurocognitive impairment and dementia in HIV-infected adults

Andrew J. Levine, Susan Service, Eric N. Miller, Sandra M. Reynolds, Elyse J. Singer, Paul Shapshak, Eileen M. Martin, Ned Sacktor, James T. Becker, Lisa Paula Jacobson, Paul Thompson, Nelson Freimer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The neuropathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) is unclear. Candidate gene studies have implicated genetic susceptibility loci within immune-related genes; however, these have not been reliably validated. Here, we employed genome-wide association (GWA) methods to discover novel genetic susceptibility loci associated with HAND, and validate susceptibility loci implicated in prior candidate gene studies. Data from 1,287 participants enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study between 1985 and 2010 were used. Genotyping was conducted with Illumina 1M, 1MDuo, or 550K platform. Linear mixed models determined subject-specific slopes for change over time in processing speed and executive functioning, considering all visits including baseline and the most recent study visit. Covariates modeled as fixed effects included: time since the first visit, depression severity, nadir CD4+ T-cell count, hepatitis C co-infection, substance use, and antiretroviral medication regimen. Prevalence of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and neurocognitive impairment (NCI) was also examined as neurocognitive phenotypes in a case-control analysis. No genetic susceptibility loci were associated with decline in processing speed or executive functioning among almost 2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) directly genotyped or imputed. No association between the SNPs and HAD or NCI were found. Previously reported associations between specific genetic susceptibility loci, HIV-associated NCI, and HAD were not validated. In this first GWAS of HAND, no novel or previously identified genetic susceptibility loci were associated with any of the phenotypes examined. Due to the relatively small sample size, future collaborative efforts that incorporate this dataset may still yield important findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)669-683
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Genetics
Volume159 B
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

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Keywords

  • Genome-wide association
  • HIV
  • HIV-associated dementia
  • HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder
  • NeuroAIDS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Levine, A. J., Service, S., Miller, E. N., Reynolds, S. M., Singer, E. J., Shapshak, P., Martin, E. M., Sacktor, N., Becker, J. T., Jacobson, L. P., Thompson, P., & Freimer, N. (2012). Genome-wide association study of neurocognitive impairment and dementia in HIV-infected adults. American Journal of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 159 B(6), 669-683. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.b.32071