Genome evolution in yeast reveals connections between rare mutations in human cancers

Xinchen Teng, J. Marie Hardwick

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Cancer cells are riddled with mutations. Less than one percent of these are thought to be mutations that drive cancer phenotypes. However, a recent study conducted on the yeast knockout collections by Teng et al. [Mol. Cell (2013) 52: 485–494] provides hard evidence that single gene deletions/mutations in most non-essential genes can drive the selection for cancer-like mutations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-209
Number of pages4
JournalMicrobial Cell
Volume1
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

Keywords

  • Cancer progression
  • Genome evolution
  • Secondary mutations
  • Yeast knockouts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)

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