Genital dysplasia in women infected with human immunodeficiency virus

Gregory Taylor, Tracy Wolff, Niharika Khanna, Priscilla Furth, Patricia Langenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are at increased risk for the development of dysplastic genital lesions. Traditionally, markers of immunosuppression were predictive of the development of dysplasia. Recent advances in antiretroviral medications allow restoration of a once-depressed CD4+ cell count and suppression of HIV replication. In this new era, additional predictive markers of genital dysplasia are needed for management of women infected with with HIV. Objective: To find predictive markers of genital dysplasia in women infected with HIV. Design: Observational study of a consecutive sample of 200 women infected with HIV from an urban university clinic. Measurements of histopathology, CD4+ count, CD4+ nadir, HIV viral load, human papillomavirus (HPV), and usage of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were evaluated for an association with genital dysplasia. Results: There was a trend toward a protective effect against any genital dysplasia when HAART had been prescribed [relative risk = 0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56, 1.06] and HAART therapy resulted in an immune response (relative risk, 0.61; 95% CI, 36, 1.02). High-risk HPV DNA was a strong predictor of dysplasia (P = .0003). A lower CD4+ count nadir was strongly associated with genital dysplasia (P = .0003). Conclusion: A history of greater immunosuppression, as measured by the nadir of a patient's CD4+ count, is the strongest predictor of genital dysplasia in women infected with HIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)108-113
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Practice
Volume17
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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    Taylor, G., Wolff, T., Khanna, N., Furth, P., & Langenberg, P. (2004). Genital dysplasia in women infected with human immunodeficiency virus. Journal of the American Board of Family Practice, 17(2), 108-113.