Genetics of obsessive-compulsive disorder: A research update

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The genetic study of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has made significant gains in the past decade. However, etiological gene findings are still elusive. Epidemiological studies, including family and twin studies, strongly support a genetic component for OCD. In addition, complex segregation analyses suggest the presence of at least one major gene. The neurobiology of OCD also lends support to the notion that programmed CNS-based biological processes underlie OCD symptom expression, with mapping of brain circuits to fronto-subcortical circuits in a consistent manner. Genetic linkage studies of OCD, using families with multiple affected relatives, have generated several suggestive linkage peaks, regions that may harbor a gene or genes for OCD. However, the presence of multiple linkage peaks has added to the complexity of OCD genetics, suggesting that the exploration of gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions, in addition to the exploration of alternate phenotypes based on symptom expression, age at onset or comorbid conditions, may be key in locating etiologic genes. Finally, candidate gene studies, while promising, are not yet associated with linkage regions, except in the case of the glutamate transporter gene SLC1A1 in 9p24. While OCD appears to have a genetic component, additional innovative research is needed to unravel the genetic influences in the disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)967-980
Number of pages14
JournalExpert Review of Neurotherapeutics
Volume7
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007

Fingerprint

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Research
Genes
Brain Mapping
Biological Phenomena
Amino Acid Transport System X-AG
Gene-Environment Interaction
Twin Studies
Genetic Linkage
Neurobiology
Age of Onset
Epidemiologic Studies
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Association
  • Dopamine
  • Genetics
  • Linkage
  • Obsessive-compulsive
  • Segregation
  • Serotonin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Genetics of obsessive-compulsive disorder : A research update. / Grados, Marco; Wilcox, Holly.

In: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, Vol. 7, No. 8, 08.2007, p. 967-980.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b6b98715e8404fbd8b8ff1e9f444bef1,
title = "Genetics of obsessive-compulsive disorder: A research update",
abstract = "The genetic study of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has made significant gains in the past decade. However, etiological gene findings are still elusive. Epidemiological studies, including family and twin studies, strongly support a genetic component for OCD. In addition, complex segregation analyses suggest the presence of at least one major gene. The neurobiology of OCD also lends support to the notion that programmed CNS-based biological processes underlie OCD symptom expression, with mapping of brain circuits to fronto-subcortical circuits in a consistent manner. Genetic linkage studies of OCD, using families with multiple affected relatives, have generated several suggestive linkage peaks, regions that may harbor a gene or genes for OCD. However, the presence of multiple linkage peaks has added to the complexity of OCD genetics, suggesting that the exploration of gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions, in addition to the exploration of alternate phenotypes based on symptom expression, age at onset or comorbid conditions, may be key in locating etiologic genes. Finally, candidate gene studies, while promising, are not yet associated with linkage regions, except in the case of the glutamate transporter gene SLC1A1 in 9p24. While OCD appears to have a genetic component, additional innovative research is needed to unravel the genetic influences in the disorder.",
keywords = "Association, Dopamine, Genetics, Linkage, Obsessive-compulsive, Segregation, Serotonin",
author = "Marco Grados and Holly Wilcox",
year = "2007",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1586/14737175.7.8.967",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "967--980",
journal = "Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics",
issn = "1473-7175",
publisher = "Expert Reviews Ltd.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetics of obsessive-compulsive disorder

T2 - A research update

AU - Grados, Marco

AU - Wilcox, Holly

PY - 2007/8

Y1 - 2007/8

N2 - The genetic study of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has made significant gains in the past decade. However, etiological gene findings are still elusive. Epidemiological studies, including family and twin studies, strongly support a genetic component for OCD. In addition, complex segregation analyses suggest the presence of at least one major gene. The neurobiology of OCD also lends support to the notion that programmed CNS-based biological processes underlie OCD symptom expression, with mapping of brain circuits to fronto-subcortical circuits in a consistent manner. Genetic linkage studies of OCD, using families with multiple affected relatives, have generated several suggestive linkage peaks, regions that may harbor a gene or genes for OCD. However, the presence of multiple linkage peaks has added to the complexity of OCD genetics, suggesting that the exploration of gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions, in addition to the exploration of alternate phenotypes based on symptom expression, age at onset or comorbid conditions, may be key in locating etiologic genes. Finally, candidate gene studies, while promising, are not yet associated with linkage regions, except in the case of the glutamate transporter gene SLC1A1 in 9p24. While OCD appears to have a genetic component, additional innovative research is needed to unravel the genetic influences in the disorder.

AB - The genetic study of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has made significant gains in the past decade. However, etiological gene findings are still elusive. Epidemiological studies, including family and twin studies, strongly support a genetic component for OCD. In addition, complex segregation analyses suggest the presence of at least one major gene. The neurobiology of OCD also lends support to the notion that programmed CNS-based biological processes underlie OCD symptom expression, with mapping of brain circuits to fronto-subcortical circuits in a consistent manner. Genetic linkage studies of OCD, using families with multiple affected relatives, have generated several suggestive linkage peaks, regions that may harbor a gene or genes for OCD. However, the presence of multiple linkage peaks has added to the complexity of OCD genetics, suggesting that the exploration of gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions, in addition to the exploration of alternate phenotypes based on symptom expression, age at onset or comorbid conditions, may be key in locating etiologic genes. Finally, candidate gene studies, while promising, are not yet associated with linkage regions, except in the case of the glutamate transporter gene SLC1A1 in 9p24. While OCD appears to have a genetic component, additional innovative research is needed to unravel the genetic influences in the disorder.

KW - Association

KW - Dopamine

KW - Genetics

KW - Linkage

KW - Obsessive-compulsive

KW - Segregation

KW - Serotonin

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548073024&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34548073024&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1586/14737175.7.8.967

DO - 10.1586/14737175.7.8.967

M3 - Article

C2 - 17678492

AN - SCOPUS:34548073024

VL - 7

SP - 967

EP - 980

JO - Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

JF - Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

SN - 1473-7175

IS - 8

ER -