Genetic variation of kinases and activation of nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir

Allyson N. Hamlin, Joseph Tillotson, Namandje N Bumpus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As antiretroviral therapy has become more accessible across the world and coformulations have improved patient compliance; the morbidity and mortality of HIV/AIDS has decreased. However, there is still a substantial gap in knowledge regarding the impact of genetic variation on the metabolism of and response to some of the most commonly prescribed antiretrovirals, including the nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir. While it has been scientifically established that tenofovir must be activated to be efficacious against HIV, the enzymes responsible for this activation have not been well characterized. The purpose of this review is to summarize and clarify the scientific knowledge regarding the enzymes that phosphorylate and activate this clinically important drug.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-111
Number of pages7
JournalPharmacogenomics
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Tenofovir
Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors
Phosphotransferases
Nucleotides
HIV
Enzyme Activation
Patient Compliance
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Morbidity
Mortality
Enzymes
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • antiretroviral therapy
  • drug metabolism
  • genetic variants
  • HIV
  • precision medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Genetic variation of kinases and activation of nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir. / Hamlin, Allyson N.; Tillotson, Joseph; Bumpus, Namandje N.

In: Pharmacogenomics, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.01.2019, p. 105-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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