Genetic Variation and Hematology: Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms, Haplotypes, and Complex Disease

Stephen Chanock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the course of generating a draft sequence of the human genome, we now recognize the enormous scope of genetic variation among humans, which can be used to probe the genetics of complex diseases such as leukemia or thrombosis. There is already mounting evidence of new susceptibility genes and genes that interact with environmental factors. Genetic variants, especially single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), also can be utilized to investigate potential modifiers of disease. Genetic variation can be applied to study pharmacogenomics, which could eventually drive the choice of therapeutic and interventional strategies. The genomic revolution ultimately should give insights into key mechanisms in hematological disorders that can be translated into targeted therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-328
Number of pages8
JournalSeminars in Hematology
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Genetic Variation and Hematology: Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms, Haplotypes, and Complex Disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this