Genetic polymorphisms in oxidative stress pathway genes and modification of BMI and risk of non-hodgkin lymphoma

Christopher Kim, Tongzhang Zheng, Qing Lan, Yingtai Chen, Francine Foss, Xuezhong Chen, Theodore Holford, Brian Leaderer, Peter Boyle, Stephen J. Chanock, Nathaniel Rothman, Yawei Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Being overweight and obese increases oxidative stress in the body. To test the hypothesis that genetic variations in oxidative stress pathway genes modify the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we conducted a population-based case-control study in Connecticut women. Methods: Individuals who were overweight/obese (BMI ≥ 25) were compared with normal and underweight individuals (BMI < 25), and their risk of NHL stratified assuming a dominant allele model for each oxidative stress pathway single-nucleotide polymorphism. Results: Polymorphisms in AKR1A1, AKR1C1, AKR1C3, CYBA, GPX1, MPO, NCF2, NCF4, NOS1, NOS2A NOS3, OGG1, ATG9B, SOD1, SOD2, SOD3, RAC1, and RAC2 genes after false discovery rate adjustment did not modify the association between BMI and risk of NHL overall and histologic subtypes. Conclusions: The results suggest that common genetic variations in oxidative stress genes do not modify the relationship between BMI and risk of NHL. Impact: Studies of BMI and oxidative stress independently may elevate NHL risk, but this study suggests no interaction of the two risk factors. Future studies with larger study populations may reveal interactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)866-868
Number of pages3
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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