Genetic modification of Anopheles stephensi for resistance to multiple Plasmodium falciparum strains does not influence susceptibility to o’nyong’nyong virus or insecticides, or Wolbachia-mediated resistance to the malaria parasite

Andrew Pike, George Dimopoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mosquitoes that have been genetically engineered for resistance to human pathogens are a potential new tool for controlling vector-borne disease. However, genetic modification may have unintended off-target effects that could affect the mosquitoes’ utility for disease control. We measured the resistance of five genetically modified Plasmodium-suppressing Anopheles stephensi lines to o’nyong’nyong virus, four classes of insecticides, and diverse Plasmodium falciparum field isolates and characterized the interactions between our genetic modifications and infection with the bacterium Wolbachia. The genetic modifications did not alter the mosquitoes’ resistance to either o’nyong’nyong virus or insecticides, and the mosquitoes were equally resistant to all tested P. falciparum strains, regardless of Wolbachia infection status. These results indicate that mosquitoes can be genetically modified for resistance to malaria parasite infection and remain compatible with other vector-control measures without becoming better vectors for other pathogens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0195720
JournalPLoS One
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Genetic modification of Anopheles stephensi for resistance to multiple Plasmodium falciparum strains does not influence susceptibility to o’nyong’nyong virus or insecticides, or Wolbachia-mediated resistance to the malaria parasite'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this