Genetic factors predisposing to autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, chronic thrombocytopenic purpura, and systemic lupus erythematosus

Scott M. Lippman, Frank C. Arnett, C. Lockard Conley, Paul Michael Ness, Deborah A. Meyers, Wilma B. Bias

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Genetic factors predisposing to autoimmune diseases were investigated in 10 families having more than one affected member. Seventy relatives and 23 spouses from two large kindreds (one in whom the proband had autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the other immune thrombocytopenic purpura) were examined for immunologically mediated disorders, autoantibodies, immunoglobulin abnormalities, and HLA genotypes. Significant differences between relatives and spouses were found for immune diseases (21 percent versus 0 percent; p = 0.02), antinuclear antibody titer of 1:80 or more (18 percent versus 0 percent; p = 0.04), single-strand DNA antibodies (18 percent versus 0 percent; p = 0.04), high-titer anti-nuclear antibody or antibodies to single-strand DNA or both (33 percent versus 0 percent; p = 0.001), and the combined frequencies of immune diseases and serologic abnormalities (44 percent versus 4 percent; p = 0.0004). Similar frequencies were found in 41 relatives from eight families in whom the proband had SLE. Segregation analyses using these abnormalities as genetic traits were most compatible with a Mendelian dominant model. Impressive odds (100:1) against linkage to HLA were calculated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)827-840
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Journal of Medicine
Volume73
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Thrombocytopenic Purpura
Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia
Causality
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Autoimmune Diseases
Immune System Diseases
Spouses
Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura
Antibodies
Antinuclear Antibodies
DNA
Autoantibodies
Immunoglobulins
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Genotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Genetic factors predisposing to autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, chronic thrombocytopenic purpura, and systemic lupus erythematosus. / Lippman, Scott M.; Arnett, Frank C.; Conley, C. Lockard; Ness, Paul Michael; Meyers, Deborah A.; Bias, Wilma B.

In: American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 73, No. 6, 1982, p. 827-840.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lippman, Scott M. ; Arnett, Frank C. ; Conley, C. Lockard ; Ness, Paul Michael ; Meyers, Deborah A. ; Bias, Wilma B. / Genetic factors predisposing to autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, chronic thrombocytopenic purpura, and systemic lupus erythematosus. In: American Journal of Medicine. 1982 ; Vol. 73, No. 6. pp. 827-840.
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