Genetic diversity and naturally polymorphisms in HIV type 1 integrase isolates from Maputo, Mozambique: Implications for integrase inhibitors

Michelli F. Oliveira, Dulce B. Ramalho, Celina M. Abreu, Adolfo Vubil, Nédio Mabunda, Nalia Ismael, Cidia Francisco, Ilesh V. Jani, Amilcar Tanuri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

HIV proviral DNA integration into the host chromosome is carried out by integrase becoming an important target antiretroviral therapy. Raltegravir was the first integrase inhibitor approved for use in HIV therapy and elvitegravir is in the late phase of clinical development; both show good results in monotherapy studies and may be used worldwide for rescue therapy. In this work we analyzed 57 integrase sequences obtained from samples from drug-naive and first line regime-failing patients from Maputo, Mozambique, to evaluate the presence of natural polymorphisms and resistance mutations associated with raltegravir and elvitegravir. No major mutations conferring resistance to integrase inhibitors were found and polymorphic accessory mutations were solely observed in low frequency among subtype C sequences-L74M (3.4%), T97A (1.8%), and E157Q (1.8%)-suggesting that this new antiretroviral drug class will be effective in Mozambique providing a good perspective to the introduction of this class of drugs in that country.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1788-1792
Number of pages5
JournalAIDS research and human retroviruses
Volume28
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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