Genetic determinants of responsiveness to antiplatelet therapy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Antiplatelet drugs are well-established therapies for acute coronary syndromes and for the primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease. However, wide interindividual variability exists in the degree of platelet suppression among patients treated with antiplatelet drugs, and many individuals develop atherothrombotic events while on therapy. Although many potential mechanisms may contribute to the response variation observed, there is accumulating evidence that polymorphisms of genes from multiple biologic pathways involved in platelet activation are at least partly responsible for variable platelet responsiveness and potentially responsible for clinical failure of antiplatelet therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-484
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Cardiovascular Risk Reports
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Blood Platelets
Peripheral Vascular Diseases
Platelet Activation
Primary Prevention
Acute Coronary Syndrome
Secondary Prevention
Coronary Artery Disease
Therapeutics
Stroke
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Genetic determinants of responsiveness to antiplatelet therapy. / Kral, Brian G.; Lawal, Lookman; Becker, Lewis C.

In: Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports, Vol. 2, No. 6, 2008, p. 476-484.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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