Genetic characterization of immortalized human prostate epithelial cell cultures: Evidence for structural rearrangements of chromosome 8 and i(8q) chromosome formation in primary tumor-derived cells

Jill A. Macoska, Ben Beheshti, Johng S. Rhim, Bharati Hukku, Jeff Lehr, Kenneth Pienta, Jeremy A. Squire

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We have utilized a combination of conventional and spectral karyotyping (SKY) techniques and allelotype analysis to assess numerical and structural chromosome alterations in two cell lines derived from normal human prostatic epithelium, and three cell lines derived from human prostate primary tumor epithelium, immortalized with the E6 and E7 transforming genes of human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 or the large T-antigen gene of simian virus 40 (SV40). These studies revealed trisomy for chromosome 20 and rearrangements involving chromosomes 3, 4, 8, 9, 10, 16, 17, 18, 19, 21, or 22. In addition, the four HPV-immortalized cell lines exhibited extensive duplications or translocations involving the 11q chromosomal region. Interestingly, allelotyping data disclosed loss of 8p sequences in two of the three primary tumor-derived cell lines, and SKY data revealed that the loss of 8p sequences was directly due to i(8q) chromosome formation and/or other structural alterations of chromosome 8. This provides intriguing evidence that 8p loss in primary human prostate tumors may, in some cases, result from complex structural rearrangements involving chromosome 8. Moreover, the data reported here provide direct evidence that such complex structural rearrangements sometimes include i(8q) chromosome formation. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-57
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Genetics and Cytogenetics
Volume120
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Papillomaviridae
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8
Spectral Karyotyping
Prostate
Cell Culture Techniques
Chromosomes
Epithelial Cells
Cell Line
Epithelium
Neoplasms
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3
Simian virus 40
Viral Tumor Antigens
Tumor Cell Line
Oncogenes
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Genetic characterization of immortalized human prostate epithelial cell cultures : Evidence for structural rearrangements of chromosome 8 and i(8q) chromosome formation in primary tumor-derived cells. / Macoska, Jill A.; Beheshti, Ben; Rhim, Johng S.; Hukku, Bharati; Lehr, Jeff; Pienta, Kenneth; Squire, Jeremy A.

In: Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics, Vol. 120, No. 1, 01.07.2000, p. 50-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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