Gender perspective in the analysis of the relationship between long workhours, health and health-related behavior

Lucía Artazcoz, Imma Cortès, Carme Borrell, Vicenta Escribà-Agüir, Lorena Cascant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: The objective of this study was to analyze gender differences in the impact of long workhours (>40 hours per week) on a variety of health outcomes and health-related behavior. Methods: The sample included all salaried contract workers aged 16-64 years (1658 men and 1134 women) and interviewed in the 2002 Catalonian Health Survey. Results: Whereas the men with a high job status were more likely to work >40 hours a week, long workhours were associated with situations of vulnerability (low job status and being separated or divorced) among the women. For both genders, working >40 hours was related to a shortage of sleep [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.54, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.21-1.98, for the men and aOR 1.63, 95% CI 1.11-2.38, for the women]. Among the women, long workhours were also associated with poor mental health status (aOR 1.58, 95% CI 104-2.40), hypertension (aOR 2.25, 95% CI 1.17-4.32), job dissatisfaction (aOR 1.77, 95% CI 1.08-2.90), and smoking (aOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.22-2.39). In addition, among the women working more hours at home, long workhours were related to sedentary leisure time activity (aOR 1.98, 95% CI 1.06-3.71). Conclusions: The relationship between long workhours and health and health-related behavior was found to be directly related to long worktime and indirectly related to long exposure to poor work conditions among the women and, to a less extent, to domestic work. The pathways that explain the relationship between long work-hours and health and health-related behavior seems to depend on the outcome being analyzed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)344-350
Number of pages7
JournalScandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
Volume33
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

confidence interval
gender
confidence
Odds Ratio
Health
Confidence Intervals
health
domestic work
contract workers
Working Women
hypertension
health survey
Divorce
sleep
working hours
leisure time
mental health
Leisure Activities
health status
Contracts

Keywords

  • Hypertension
  • Mental health
  • Physical activity
  • Sleep
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Toxicology
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Gender perspective in the analysis of the relationship between long workhours, health and health-related behavior. / Artazcoz, Lucía; Cortès, Imma; Borrell, Carme; Escribà-Agüir, Vicenta; Cascant, Lorena.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, Vol. 33, No. 5, 10.2007, p. 344-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Artazcoz, Lucía ; Cortès, Imma ; Borrell, Carme ; Escribà-Agüir, Vicenta ; Cascant, Lorena. / Gender perspective in the analysis of the relationship between long workhours, health and health-related behavior. In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health. 2007 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 344-350.
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