Gender Differences in Use of Prayer as a Self-Care Strategy for Managing Symptoms in African Americans Living With HIV/AIDS

Christopher Lance Coleman, William L. Holzemer, Lucille Sanzero Eller, Inge Corless, Nancy Reynolds, Kathleen M. Nokes, Jeanne K. Kemppainen, Pam Dole, Kenn Kirksey, Liz Seficik, Patrice Nicholas, Mary Jane Hamilton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective of this study was to explore the association of gender to use of prayer as a self-care strategy for managing the HIV-related symptoms of fatigue, nausea, depression, and anxiety among African American men and women who are HIV-seropositive. To accomplish this, data were determined using convenience sampling from a sample of 448 African American men and women from the United States who were participants in a national study on self-care symptom management of HIV/AIDS. Chi-square analyses were used to examine the potential relationships between gender and the use of prayer for managing the four symptoms. The mean age of the sample was 42.69 ± 7.93 years (range, 20-66). Results showed the following gender differences in the use of prayer as a self-care strategy: fatigue-men 46% (n = 62), women 54% (n = 74); nausea-men 52% (n = 33), women 48% (n = 30); depression-men 55% (n = 90), women 45% (n = 73); and anxiety-men 77% (n = 83), women 87% (n = 73). Chi-square analyses determined that significant differences exist between African American men and women in the frequency of the use of prayer for managing HIV-related fatigue (χ2 = 14.81, 1 df, p = .000), nausea (χ2 = 4.10, 1 df, p =.043), and depression (χ2 = 5.21, 1 df, p = .022). There was no gender difference in the use of prayer to manage anxiety. Prayer was reported as a self-care strategy by over 50% of the respondents for three of the four symptoms and was rated highly efficacious. The authors conclude that the African American men and women differed in their selection of prayer as a self-care strategy for managing HIV-related depression, fatigue, and nausea. A higher proportion of women than men used prayer to manage fatigue, and more men than women reported using prayer to manage nausea and depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-23
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • HIV symptoms
  • prayer
  • self-care strategies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Gender Differences in Use of Prayer as a Self-Care Strategy for Managing Symptoms in African Americans Living With HIV/AIDS'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Coleman, C. L., Holzemer, W. L., Eller, L. S., Corless, I., Reynolds, N., Nokes, K. M., Kemppainen, J. K., Dole, P., Kirksey, K., Seficik, L., Nicholas, P., & Hamilton, M. J. (2006). Gender Differences in Use of Prayer as a Self-Care Strategy for Managing Symptoms in African Americans Living With HIV/AIDS. Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, 17(4), 16-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jana.2006.05.005