Gender Differences in Street Economy and Social Network Correlates of Arrest among Heroin Injectors in Baltimore, Maryland

Aaron D. Curry, Carl A Latkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In a sample of 761 heroin injectors in Baltimore, Maryland, correlates of arrest for drug-related and non-drug-related criminal offenses, by gender, were examined. This investigation examined gender differences in involvement in the drug economy and correlates of arrest. Correlates included roles in the street drug economy, social network attributes, and economic and demographic variables. Gender differences were found. Selling drugs was strongly associated with drug-related arrests for males. Steering (i.e., publicizing drug brands) was highly associated with drug-related arrests for females. Level of heroin addiction was associated with drug-related arrests for males, but not for females. The associations of social network variables with arrests also differed by gender. For females but not males, a higher number of females in one's network was associated with a lower frequency of arrests. For males, having at least one heroin injector in the personal network was associated with a decreased frequency of arrest, while for females the direction of the association was reversed. These findings suggest the importance of modeling drug behaviors by gender.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)482-493
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Urban Health
Volume80
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2003

Fingerprint

Baltimore
Heroin
Social Support
gender-specific factors
social network
drug
economy
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Heroin Dependence
gender
Drug Design
Street Drugs
drug dependence
selling
social economics
Economics
Demography
offense

Keywords

  • Arrest
  • Drug economy
  • Gender
  • Injection drug use
  • Social networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Gender Differences in Street Economy and Social Network Correlates of Arrest among Heroin Injectors in Baltimore, Maryland. / Curry, Aaron D.; Latkin, Carl A.

In: Journal of Urban Health, Vol. 80, No. 3, 09.2003, p. 482-493.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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