Gender differences in smoking and cessation behaviors among young adults after implementation of local comprehensive tobacco control

Jennifer A. Ellis, Sarah B. Perl, Karen Davis, Laura Vichinsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. We sought to study gender differences in young adult smoking declines and enrollment in populationwide cessation services. Methods. The New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene implemented populationwide cessation programs to distribute free nicotine replacement therapy (NRT); demographic data were collected from enrollees. Smoking prevalence was assessed using data from the Community Health Survey, an annual population-based survey. Results. Between 2002 and 2005, smoking among young adults in NYC declined from 23.8% to 18.8%, which was explained entirely by a 41.8% decline among young adult women (23.2% to 13.5); prevalence remained at 24% among young adult men. More young adult women enrolled in cessation services than did men, although once enrolled, the likelihood of using NRT was high among both groups. Conclusions. Among young adults, women have been responsive to comprehensive tobacco control, but men require more-intensive strategies. Population-wide NRT distribution can be effective with young adults overall; however, additional resources need to be devoted to identifying successful outreach strategies for young adult men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)310-316
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume98
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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