Gender differences in patient-reported outcomes among adults with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

Victor Okunrintemi, Javier Valero-Elizondo, Benjamin Patrick, Joseph Salami, Martin Tibuakuu, Saba Ahmad, Oluseye Ogunmoroti, Shiwani Mahajan, Safi U. Khan, Martha Gulati, Khurram Nasir, Erin D. Michos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background-Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) accounts for approximately one third of deaths in women. Although there is an established relationship between positive patient experiences, health-related quality of life, and improved health outcomes, little is known about gender differences in patient-reported outcomes among ASCVD patients. We therefore compared gender differences in patient-centered outcomes among individuals with ASCVD. Methods and Results-Data from the 2006 to 2015 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative US sample, were used for this study. Adults ≥18 years with a diagnosis of ASCVD, ascertained by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes and/or self-reported data, were included. Linear and logistic regression were used to compare self-reported patient experience, perception of health, and health-related quality of life by gender. Models adjusted for demographics, socioeconomic status, and comorbidities. There were 21 353 participants included, with >10 000 (47%-weighted) of the participants being women, representing ≈11 million female adults with ASCVD nationwide. Compared with men, women with ASCVD were more likely to experience poor patient-provider communication (odds ratio 1.25 [95% confidence interval 1.11- 1.41]), lower healthcare satisfaction (1.12 [1.02-1.24]), poor perception of health status (1.15 [1.04-1.28]), and lower healthrelated quality of life scores. Women with ASCVD also had lower use of aspirin and statins, and greater odds of ≥2 Emergency Department visits/y. Conclusions-Women with ASCVD were more likely to report poorer patient experience, lower health-related quality of life, and poorer perception of their health when compared with men. These findings have important public health implications and require more research towards understanding the gender-specific differences in healthcare quality, delivery, and ultimately health outcomes among individuals with ASCVD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere010498
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume7
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Health outcomes
  • Health-related quality of life
  • Secondary prevention
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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  • Cite this

    Okunrintemi, V., Valero-Elizondo, J., Patrick, B., Salami, J., Tibuakuu, M., Ahmad, S., Ogunmoroti, O., Mahajan, S., Khan, S. U., Gulati, M., Nasir, K., & Michos, E. D. (2018). Gender differences in patient-reported outcomes among adults with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Journal of the American Heart Association, 7(24), [e010498]. https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.118.010498