Gender differences in indices of opioid dependency and medical comorbidity in a population of hospitalized HIV-infected African-Americans

Susan J. Boyd, Neena F. Thomas-Gosain, Annie Umbricht, Marvin J. Tucker, Jo M. Leslie, Richard E. Chaisson, Kenzie L. Preston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined gender differences in drug use patterns and in medical presentation among 520 hospitalized, HIV-infected African-Americans. Substance abuse history was self-reported, and medical data were obtained by chart review. Overall, 321 (65%) reported ever having used heroin, with equivalent rates in men and women. Women were more likely to report current use, to have sought treatment, and tended to feel more dependent on heroin than men. Among heroin users, women were more likely to be admitted for conditions related to drug use, rather than AIDS, and to have CD4 counts > 200/mm3. These gender differences in opioid dependency and medical comorbidity may indicate a need for alternative treatment approaches for men and women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-291
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal on Addictions
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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