Gender Differences in Depression Literacy and Stigma After a Randomized Controlled Evaluation of a Universal Depression Education Program

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Abstract

Purpose: Depression is a debilitating illness with frequent onset during adolescence. Depression affects women more often than men; men are more likely to complete suicide and less likely to seek treatment. The Adolescent Depression Awareness Program (ADAP) is a school-based depression intervention that educates adolescents about depression symptoms and addresses accompanying stigma. The study aims examined gender differences in the ADAP's impact on depression literacy and stigma. Methods: Data came from a randomized trial (2012–2015). Six thousand six hundred seventy-nine students from 54 schools in several states were matched into pairs and randomized to the intervention or wait-list control. Teachers delivered the ADAP as part of the health curriculum. Depression literacy and stigma outcomes were measured before intervention, 6 weeks later, and at 4 months. Multilevel models evaluated whether gender moderated the effect of ADAP on depression literacy and stigma. Results: At 4 months, there was a main effect of the ADAP on depression literacy (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3, p =.001) with intervention students achieving depression literacy at higher rates than controls. Gender exhibited a main effect, with women showing greater rates of depression literacy than men (OR = 1.51, p =.001). There was no significant intervention × gender interaction. The ADAP did not exhibit a significant main effect on stigma. There was a main effect for gender, with women demonstrating less stigma than men (OR =.65, p =.001). There was no significant interaction between the intervention and gender on stigma. Conclusions: The ADAP demonstrates effectiveness for increasing rates of depression literacy among high school students. In this study, gender was not associated with ADAP's effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Depression
Education
Literacy
Odds Ratio
Students
Program Evaluation
Curriculum
Suicide

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Depression
  • School-based interventions
  • Stigma
  • Universal depression education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{3aa8b857c5e4434386dfcfdc0caa60cf,
title = "Gender Differences in Depression Literacy and Stigma After a Randomized Controlled Evaluation of a Universal Depression Education Program",
abstract = "Purpose: Depression is a debilitating illness with frequent onset during adolescence. Depression affects women more often than men; men are more likely to complete suicide and less likely to seek treatment. The Adolescent Depression Awareness Program (ADAP) is a school-based depression intervention that educates adolescents about depression symptoms and addresses accompanying stigma. The study aims examined gender differences in the ADAP's impact on depression literacy and stigma. Methods: Data came from a randomized trial (2012–2015). Six thousand six hundred seventy-nine students from 54 schools in several states were matched into pairs and randomized to the intervention or wait-list control. Teachers delivered the ADAP as part of the health curriculum. Depression literacy and stigma outcomes were measured before intervention, 6 weeks later, and at 4 months. Multilevel models evaluated whether gender moderated the effect of ADAP on depression literacy and stigma. Results: At 4 months, there was a main effect of the ADAP on depression literacy (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3, p =.001) with intervention students achieving depression literacy at higher rates than controls. Gender exhibited a main effect, with women showing greater rates of depression literacy than men (OR = 1.51, p =.001). There was no significant intervention × gender interaction. The ADAP did not exhibit a significant main effect on stigma. There was a main effect for gender, with women demonstrating less stigma than men (OR =.65, p =.001). There was no significant interaction between the intervention and gender on stigma. Conclusions: The ADAP demonstrates effectiveness for increasing rates of depression literacy among high school students. In this study, gender was not associated with ADAP's effectiveness.",
keywords = "Adolescence, Depression, School-based interventions, Stigma, Universal depression education",
author = "Lisa Townsend and Musci, {Rashelle Jean} and Elizabeth Stuart and Kathryn Heley and Beaudry, {Mary Beth} and Schweizer, {Barbara W} and Ruble, {Anne Elizabeth} and Swartz, {Karen L} and Holly Wilcox",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jadohealth.2018.10.298",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Health",
issn = "1054-139X",
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T1 - Gender Differences in Depression Literacy and Stigma After a Randomized Controlled Evaluation of a Universal Depression Education Program

AU - Townsend, Lisa

AU - Musci, Rashelle Jean

AU - Stuart, Elizabeth

AU - Heley, Kathryn

AU - Beaudry, Mary Beth

AU - Schweizer, Barbara W

AU - Ruble, Anne Elizabeth

AU - Swartz, Karen L

AU - Wilcox, Holly

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Purpose: Depression is a debilitating illness with frequent onset during adolescence. Depression affects women more often than men; men are more likely to complete suicide and less likely to seek treatment. The Adolescent Depression Awareness Program (ADAP) is a school-based depression intervention that educates adolescents about depression symptoms and addresses accompanying stigma. The study aims examined gender differences in the ADAP's impact on depression literacy and stigma. Methods: Data came from a randomized trial (2012–2015). Six thousand six hundred seventy-nine students from 54 schools in several states were matched into pairs and randomized to the intervention or wait-list control. Teachers delivered the ADAP as part of the health curriculum. Depression literacy and stigma outcomes were measured before intervention, 6 weeks later, and at 4 months. Multilevel models evaluated whether gender moderated the effect of ADAP on depression literacy and stigma. Results: At 4 months, there was a main effect of the ADAP on depression literacy (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3, p =.001) with intervention students achieving depression literacy at higher rates than controls. Gender exhibited a main effect, with women showing greater rates of depression literacy than men (OR = 1.51, p =.001). There was no significant intervention × gender interaction. The ADAP did not exhibit a significant main effect on stigma. There was a main effect for gender, with women demonstrating less stigma than men (OR =.65, p =.001). There was no significant interaction between the intervention and gender on stigma. Conclusions: The ADAP demonstrates effectiveness for increasing rates of depression literacy among high school students. In this study, gender was not associated with ADAP's effectiveness.

AB - Purpose: Depression is a debilitating illness with frequent onset during adolescence. Depression affects women more often than men; men are more likely to complete suicide and less likely to seek treatment. The Adolescent Depression Awareness Program (ADAP) is a school-based depression intervention that educates adolescents about depression symptoms and addresses accompanying stigma. The study aims examined gender differences in the ADAP's impact on depression literacy and stigma. Methods: Data came from a randomized trial (2012–2015). Six thousand six hundred seventy-nine students from 54 schools in several states were matched into pairs and randomized to the intervention or wait-list control. Teachers delivered the ADAP as part of the health curriculum. Depression literacy and stigma outcomes were measured before intervention, 6 weeks later, and at 4 months. Multilevel models evaluated whether gender moderated the effect of ADAP on depression literacy and stigma. Results: At 4 months, there was a main effect of the ADAP on depression literacy (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3, p =.001) with intervention students achieving depression literacy at higher rates than controls. Gender exhibited a main effect, with women showing greater rates of depression literacy than men (OR = 1.51, p =.001). There was no significant intervention × gender interaction. The ADAP did not exhibit a significant main effect on stigma. There was a main effect for gender, with women demonstrating less stigma than men (OR =.65, p =.001). There was no significant interaction between the intervention and gender on stigma. Conclusions: The ADAP demonstrates effectiveness for increasing rates of depression literacy among high school students. In this study, gender was not associated with ADAP's effectiveness.

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