Gender differences in body image and health perceptions among graduating seniors from a historically black college

Susan M Gross, Tiffany L. Gary, Dorothy C. Browne, Thomas A. LaVeist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study's purpose was to identify gender differences in body size awareness and perceived impact of weight on social interactions and risk for disease among young African-American adults. A cross-sectional survey of 318 African-American graduating seniors from a historically black college or university (HBCU) was conducted. Data were collected on anthropometries, body image, ideal weight, perceived risk for disease due to weight, and impact of weight on social interactions. Only 39% of males who were overweight perceived themselves as overweight compared with 68% of overweight females. Eighty percent of females and 63% of males expressed some body size dissatisfaction. Fewer obese males (38%) perceived a risk for disease due to their weight compared with obese females (64%), p≤0.01. Males perceived greater impact than females of their weight on social interactions, with extremely obese males perceiving the greatest impact. Perceived risk for disease due to weight was related to body mass index, family weight history, body awareness and income, but not body size satisfaction. Findings suggest gender differences in the self-perception of body size, accuracy of body size perception, and understanding of acceptable weight ranges. Awareness of acceptable weight ranges and consequences of overweight needs to be raised.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1608-1619
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume97
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Body Image
Weights and Measures
Body Size
Health
Interpersonal Relations
African Americans
Size Perception
Anthropometry
Self Concept
Body Mass Index
Cross-Sectional Studies
History
Body Weight

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Obesity
  • Perceived risk of disease
  • Self-perception of body size
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gender differences in body image and health perceptions among graduating seniors from a historically black college. / Gross, Susan M; Gary, Tiffany L.; Browne, Dorothy C.; LaVeist, Thomas A.

In: Journal of the National Medical Association, Vol. 97, No. 12, 12.2005, p. 1608-1619.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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