Gender and age effects on outcome after pediatric traumatic brain injury

Wynne E. Morrison, José J. Arbelaez, James C Fackler, Antonio De Maio, Charles N. Paidas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate whether girls have better outcomes after traumatic brain injury than boys. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: University hospital. Patients: A 16,586 patient subset of the National Pediatric Trauma Registry with nonpenetrating traumatic brain injury. Interventions: Retrospective review. Measurements and Main Results: The patients were subdivided by age into prepubertal (0-7 yrs), indeterminate pubertal (8-12 yrs), and probable pubertal (13-19 yrs). All analyses were adjusted for injury severity using the Injury Severity Score. Outcome variables were in-hospital death rate, intensive care unit length of stay, total length of stay, discharge to home vs. rehabilitation, and functional status at discharge. Overall, 6.1% of girls and 5.3% of boys died. A higher proportion of girls were injured in motor vehicle crashes. Gender did not have a significant effect on in-hospital mortality rate after adjustment for age, Injury Severity Score, and motor vehicle crashes. Boys had a shorter intensive care unit length of stay (p =.027). There were no statistically significant differences between boys and girls in total hospital length of stay, functional outcome, and discharge location, although for every outcome there was a trend toward girls doing worse. Conclusions: There is evidence from this large study that girls do not have a better outcome after pediatric traumatic brain injury than boys, with a suggestion that girls may do worse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-151
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Pediatrics
Length of Stay
Injury Severity Score
Motor Vehicles
Intensive Care Units
Mortality
Wounds and Injuries
Hospital Mortality
Traumatic Brain Injury
Registries
Cohort Studies
Rehabilitation
Retrospective Studies

Keywords

  • Brain injuries
  • Length of stay
  • Mortality rate
  • Outcome assessment
  • Pediatrics
  • Sex factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Gender and age effects on outcome after pediatric traumatic brain injury. / Morrison, Wynne E.; Arbelaez, José J.; Fackler, James C; De Maio, Antonio; Paidas, Charles N.

In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2004, p. 145-151.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morrison, Wynne E. ; Arbelaez, José J. ; Fackler, James C ; De Maio, Antonio ; Paidas, Charles N. / Gender and age effects on outcome after pediatric traumatic brain injury. In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 5, No. 2. pp. 145-151.
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