Gaze Stability, Dynamic Balance and Participation Deficits in People with Multiple Sclerosis at Fall-Risk

Hina Garg, Leland E. Dibble, Michael C Schubert, Jim Sibthorp, K. Bo Foreman, Eduard Gappmaier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite the common complaints of dizziness and demyelination of afferent or efferent pathways to and from the vestibular nuclei which may adversely affect the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) and vestibulo-spinal function in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), few studies have examined gaze and dynamic balance function in PwMS. (1) Determine the differences in gaze stability, dynamic balance and participation measures between PwMS and controls, (2) Examine the relationships between gaze stability, dynamic balance and participation. Nineteen ambulatory PwMS at fall-risk and 14 age-matched controls were recruited. Outcomes included (1) gaze stability (angular aVOR gain [ratio of eye to head velocity]; number of compensatory saccades [CS] per head rotation; CS latency; gaze position error; coefficient of variation [CV] of aVOR gain), (2) dynamic balance (functional gait assessment, FGA; four square step test), and (c) participation (dizziness handicap inventory; activities-specific balance confidence scale). Separate independent t-tests and Pearson's correlations were calculated. PwMS were age = 53 ± 11.7 years and had 4.2 ± 3.3 falls/year. PwMS demonstrated significant (P < 0.05) impairments in gaze stability, dynamic balance and participation measures compared to controls. CV of aVOR gain and CS latency were significantly correlated with FGA. Deficits and correlations across a spectrum of disability measures highlight the relevance of gaze and dynamic balance assessment in PwMS. Anat Rec, 301:1852–1860, 2018.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1852-1860
Number of pages9
JournalAnatomical Record
Volume301
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

sclerosis
Multiple Sclerosis
Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex
reflexes
eyes
Saccades
Dizziness
disability
Afferent Pathways
Vestibular Nuclei
Efferent Pathways
exercise test
Demyelinating Diseases
gait
participation
Exercise Test
Gait
Head
Equipment and Supplies
test

Keywords

  • dizziness
  • gait
  • multiple sclerosis
  • postural balance
  • reflex
  • saccades
  • vestibulo-ocular

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Biotechnology
  • Histology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Gaze Stability, Dynamic Balance and Participation Deficits in People with Multiple Sclerosis at Fall-Risk. / Garg, Hina; Dibble, Leland E.; Schubert, Michael C; Sibthorp, Jim; Foreman, K. Bo; Gappmaier, Eduard.

In: Anatomical Record, Vol. 301, No. 11, 01.11.2018, p. 1852-1860.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garg, Hina ; Dibble, Leland E. ; Schubert, Michael C ; Sibthorp, Jim ; Foreman, K. Bo ; Gappmaier, Eduard. / Gaze Stability, Dynamic Balance and Participation Deficits in People with Multiple Sclerosis at Fall-Risk. In: Anatomical Record. 2018 ; Vol. 301, No. 11. pp. 1852-1860.
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