Gastrointestinal regulatory peptides and central nervous system mechanisms of weight control

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose of review: This review focuses on recent advances in understanding the multiple roles of gastrointestinal peptides in the control of food intake and body weight with specific emphasis on ghrelin, amylin and glucagon-like peptide 1. Recent findings: Recent studies support a role for ghrelin, amylin and glucagon-like peptide 1 in short-term and long-term effects on food intake and body weight. Apart from contributing to energy homeostasis, ghrelin's participation in reward and sensory processing has been the focus of much recent work. New findings on amylin's effects on food intake and energy balance provide further support for its role in meal-related food intake and suggest that it may also function as an adiposity signal. New investigations on the role of central and peripheral glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors in mediating the anorexic effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 have suggested that they differentially contribute to short-term and long term effects on food intake. Summary: Gastrointestinal peptides can influence food intake through mechanisms that involve short-term meal-related effects or through activation of central pathways involved in energy balance. An appreciation of the multiple actions of gastrointestinal peptides on food intake will aid in developing new strategies for weight management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-18
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012

Fingerprint

Central Nervous System
Eating
Weights and Measures
Peptides
Islet Amyloid Polypeptide
Ghrelin
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1
Meals
Body Weight
Adiposity
Reward
Homeostasis

Keywords

  • amylin
  • ghrelin
  • glucagon-like peptide1
  • gut hormone
  • obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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