Gail model risk assessment and risk perceptions

John M. Quillin, Elizabeth Fries, Donna McClish, Ellen Shaw DeParedes, Joann N Bodurtha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patients can benefit from accessible breast cancer risk information. The Gail model is a well-known means of providing risk information to patients and for guiding clinical decisions. Risk presentation often includes 5-year and life-time percent chances for a woman to develop breast cancer. How do women perceive their risks after Gail model risk assessment? This exploratory study used a randomized clinical trial design to address this question among women not previously selected for breast cancer risk. Results suggest a brief risk assessment intervention changes quantitative and comparative risk perceptions and improves accuracy. This study improves our understanding of risk perceptions by evaluating an intervention in a population not previously selected for high-risk status and measuring perceptions in a variety of formats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-214
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Breast Neoplasms
Randomized Controlled Trials
Population

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Gail model
  • Risk assessment
  • Risk perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Gail model risk assessment and risk perceptions. / Quillin, John M.; Fries, Elizabeth; McClish, Donna; DeParedes, Ellen Shaw; Bodurtha, Joann N.

In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 27, No. 2, 04.2004, p. 205-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Quillin, John M. ; Fries, Elizabeth ; McClish, Donna ; DeParedes, Ellen Shaw ; Bodurtha, Joann N. / Gail model risk assessment and risk perceptions. In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 205-214.
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