Further trends in the etiology of end-stage renal disease in African- Americans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Publications in the past year have continued to shed light on the etiology of the excess risk of end-stage renal disease end-stage renal disease among African-Americans. Prospective data now show that even mild elevations in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of end- stage renal disease. The prevalence of hypertension among African-Americans has been declining, but remains much higher than among White people. Management of hypertension is the best avenue to prevent much of the excess burden of end-stage renal disease, but the relative merits of different agents and levels of blood pressure control are still under study. In addition, individuals with human immunodeficiency virus-related end-stage renal disease represent a small but rapidly growing number off patients that are predominantly African-American. Studies are underway to examine ethnic differences and risk factors for the earlier stages of renal disease as well as genetic mutations for non-Mendelian forms of end-stage renal disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-249
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension
Volume6
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1997

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African Americans
Chronic Kidney Failure
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Publications
HIV
Kidney
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

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abstract = "Publications in the past year have continued to shed light on the etiology of the excess risk of end-stage renal disease end-stage renal disease among African-Americans. Prospective data now show that even mild elevations in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of end- stage renal disease. The prevalence of hypertension among African-Americans has been declining, but remains much higher than among White people. Management of hypertension is the best avenue to prevent much of the excess burden of end-stage renal disease, but the relative merits of different agents and levels of blood pressure control are still under study. In addition, individuals with human immunodeficiency virus-related end-stage renal disease represent a small but rapidly growing number off patients that are predominantly African-American. Studies are underway to examine ethnic differences and risk factors for the earlier stages of renal disease as well as genetic mutations for non-Mendelian forms of end-stage renal disease.",
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