Further evidence that amphetamines produce long-lasting dopamine neurochemical deficits by destroying dopamine nerve fibers

G. A. Ricaurte, L. S. Seiden, C. R. Schuster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Methamphetamine and amphetamine were continuously administered to rats for 3 days by means of subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps. The total daily dose of each drug was approximately 4 mg/day. Dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin determinations two weeks later indicated that both amphetamines produced a selective striatal dopamine depletion. Anatomical studies indicated that this depletion was associated with striatal nerve fiber degeneration. To determine whether this fiber degeneration induced by amphetamines was dopaminergic, the long-lasting dopamine depletion produced by methamphetamine was antagonized with α-methyl-para-tyrosine. This prevented the appearance of nerve fiber degeneration after methamphetamine. These findings suggest that amphetamines produce a long-term striatal dopamine depletion by destroying striatal dopamine nerve fibers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-364
Number of pages6
JournalBrain research
Volume303
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 1984
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • amphetamines
  • degeneration
  • dopamine
  • neurotoxicity
  • striatum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

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