Funding of US biomedical research, 2003-2008

E. Ray Dorsey, Jason De Roulet, Joel P. Thompson, Jason I. Reminick, Ashley Thai, Zachary White-Stellato, Christopher A. Beck, Benjamin P. George, Hamilton Moses

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context: With the exception of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, funding support for biomedical research in the United States has slowed after a decade of doubling. However, the extent and scope of slowing are largely unknown. Objective: To quantify funding of biomedical research in the United States from 2003 to 2008. Design: Publicly available data were used to quantify funding from government (federal, state, and local), private, and industry sources. Regression models were used to compare financial trends between 1994-2003 and 2003-2007. The numbers of new drug and device approvals by the US Food and Drug Administration over the same period were also evaluated. Main Outcome Measures: Funding and growth rates by source; numbers of US Food and Drug Administration approvals. Results: Biomedical research funding increased from $75.5 billion in 2003 to $101.1 billion in 2007. In 2008, funding from the National Institutes of Health and industry totaled $88.8 billion. In 2007, funding from these sources, adjusted for inflation, was $90.2 billion. Adjusted for inflation, funding from 2003 to 2007 increased by 14%, for a compound annual growth rate of 3.4%. By comparison, funding from 1994 to 2003 increased at an annual rate of 7.8% (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-143
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume303
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 13 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Drug Approval
Biomedical Research
Economic Inflation
Device Approval
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
Industry
State Government
Local Government
Federal Government
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
United States Food and Drug Administration
Growth
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dorsey, E. R., De Roulet, J., Thompson, J. P., Reminick, J. I., Thai, A., White-Stellato, Z., ... Moses, H. (2010). Funding of US biomedical research, 2003-2008. Journal of the American Medical Association, 303(2), 137-143. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2009.1987

Funding of US biomedical research, 2003-2008. / Dorsey, E. Ray; De Roulet, Jason; Thompson, Joel P.; Reminick, Jason I.; Thai, Ashley; White-Stellato, Zachary; Beck, Christopher A.; George, Benjamin P.; Moses, Hamilton.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 303, No. 2, 13.01.2010, p. 137-143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dorsey, ER, De Roulet, J, Thompson, JP, Reminick, JI, Thai, A, White-Stellato, Z, Beck, CA, George, BP & Moses, H 2010, 'Funding of US biomedical research, 2003-2008', Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 303, no. 2, pp. 137-143. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2009.1987
Dorsey ER, De Roulet J, Thompson JP, Reminick JI, Thai A, White-Stellato Z et al. Funding of US biomedical research, 2003-2008. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2010 Jan 13;303(2):137-143. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2009.1987
Dorsey, E. Ray ; De Roulet, Jason ; Thompson, Joel P. ; Reminick, Jason I. ; Thai, Ashley ; White-Stellato, Zachary ; Beck, Christopher A. ; George, Benjamin P. ; Moses, Hamilton. / Funding of US biomedical research, 2003-2008. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 2010 ; Vol. 303, No. 2. pp. 137-143.
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