Functional MR Imaging: Blood Oxygen Level–Dependent and Resting State Techniques in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Scott Rosenthal, Matthew Gray, Hudaisa Fatima, Haris I. Sair, Christopher T. Whitlow

Research output: Research - peer-reviewReview article

Abstract

This article discusses mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)-associated effects on brain functional connectivity assessed via resting-state functional MR (fMR) imaging. Several studies have reported acute post-injury default mode network hyperconnectivity, followed by a period of decreased connectivity before later connectivity normalization in some patients. Other studies have reported mTBI associated effects on connectivity that remain evident for up to 5-years or more. Discordance in the published literature regarding the direction of network connectivity changes (eg, increased versus decreased connectivity) may reflect differences in timing of data collection post-injury, as well as the need to standardize MR imaging acquisition protocols and processing methods.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages107-115
Number of pages9
JournalNeuroimaging Clinics of North America
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

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Brain Concussion
Oxygen
Wounds and Injuries
Brain
Direction compound

Keywords

  • Blood oxygen level dependent
  • Functional MR imaging
  • Mild traumatic brain injury
  • Resting state

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Functional MR Imaging : Blood Oxygen Level–Dependent and Resting State Techniques in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. / Rosenthal, Scott; Gray, Matthew; Fatima, Hudaisa; Sair, Haris I.; Whitlow, Christopher T.

In: Neuroimaging Clinics of North America, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.02.2018, p. 107-115.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewReview article

Rosenthal, Scott ; Gray, Matthew ; Fatima, Hudaisa ; Sair, Haris I. ; Whitlow, Christopher T./ Functional MR Imaging : Blood Oxygen Level–Dependent and Resting State Techniques in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. In: Neuroimaging Clinics of North America. 2018 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 107-115
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