Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) response to alcohol pictures predicts subsequent transition to heavy drinking in college students

Alecia D. Dager, Beth M. Anderson, Rivkah Rosen, Sabin Khadka, Broderick Sawyer, Rachel E. Jiantonio-Kelly, Carol S. Austad, Sarah A. Raskin, Howard Tennen, Rebecca M. Wood, Carolyn R. Fallahi, Godfrey D. Pearlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and Aims: Young adults show the highest rates of escalating drinking, yet the neural risk mechanisms remain unclear. Heavy drinkers show variant functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response to alcohol cues, which may presage increasing drinking. In this longitudinal study, we ascertained whether BOLD response to alcohol pictures predicted subsequent heavy drinking among college students. Methods: Participants were 43 18-21-year-olds in the United States who underwent BOLD scanning and completed monthly substance use surveys over the following year. Participants were categorized according to baseline and follow-up drinking into 13 continuously moderate drinkers, 16 continuously heavy drinkers and 14 transitioners who drank moderately at baseline but heavily by follow-up. During fMRI scanning at baseline, participants viewed alcohol and matched non-alcohol beverage images. Results: We observed group differences in alcohol cue-elicited BOLD response in bilateral caudate, orbitofrontal cortex, medial frontal cortex/anterior cingulate and left insula (clusters>2619ml, voxelwise F(2,40)>3.23, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)585-595
Number of pages11
JournalAddiction
Volume109
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Alcohols
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Oxygen
Drinking
Cues
Gyrus Cinguli
Beverages
Frontal Lobe
Prefrontal Cortex
Longitudinal Studies
Young Adult
Alcohol Drinking in College

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Alcoholism
  • Cue-reactivity
  • Development
  • fMRI
  • Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Dager, A. D., Anderson, B. M., Rosen, R., Khadka, S., Sawyer, B., Jiantonio-Kelly, R. E., ... Pearlson, G. D. (2014). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) response to alcohol pictures predicts subsequent transition to heavy drinking in college students. Addiction, 109(4), 585-595. https://doi.org/10.1111/add.12437

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) response to alcohol pictures predicts subsequent transition to heavy drinking in college students. / Dager, Alecia D.; Anderson, Beth M.; Rosen, Rivkah; Khadka, Sabin; Sawyer, Broderick; Jiantonio-Kelly, Rachel E.; Austad, Carol S.; Raskin, Sarah A.; Tennen, Howard; Wood, Rebecca M.; Fallahi, Carolyn R.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

In: Addiction, Vol. 109, No. 4, 04.2014, p. 585-595.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dager, AD, Anderson, BM, Rosen, R, Khadka, S, Sawyer, B, Jiantonio-Kelly, RE, Austad, CS, Raskin, SA, Tennen, H, Wood, RM, Fallahi, CR & Pearlson, GD 2014, 'Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) response to alcohol pictures predicts subsequent transition to heavy drinking in college students', Addiction, vol. 109, no. 4, pp. 585-595. https://doi.org/10.1111/add.12437
Dager, Alecia D. ; Anderson, Beth M. ; Rosen, Rivkah ; Khadka, Sabin ; Sawyer, Broderick ; Jiantonio-Kelly, Rachel E. ; Austad, Carol S. ; Raskin, Sarah A. ; Tennen, Howard ; Wood, Rebecca M. ; Fallahi, Carolyn R. ; Pearlson, Godfrey D. / Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) response to alcohol pictures predicts subsequent transition to heavy drinking in college students. In: Addiction. 2014 ; Vol. 109, No. 4. pp. 585-595.
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