Functional macroautophagy induction by influenza A virus without a contribution to major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted presentation

Joseph D. Comber, Tara M. Robinson, Nicholas A. Siciliano, Adam E. Snook, Laurence C. Eisenlohr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-presented peptides can be derived from both exogenous (extracellular) and endogenous (biosynthesized) sources of antigen. Although several endogenous antigenprocessing pathways have been reported, little is known about their relative contributions to global CD4+ T cell responses against complex antigens. Using influenza virus for this purpose, we assessed the role of macroautophagy, a process in which cytosolic proteins are delivered to the lysosome by de novo vesicle formation and membrane fusion. Influenza infection triggered productive macroautophagy, and autophagy-dependent presentation was readily observed with model antigens that naturally traffic to the autophagosome. Furthermore, treatments that enhance or inhibit macroautophagy modulated the level of presentation from these model antigens. However, validated enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) assays of influenza-specific CD4+ T cells from infected mice using a variety of antigen-presenting cells, including primary dendritic cells, revealed no detectable macroautophagy-dependent component. In contrast, the contribution of proteasome-dependent endogenous antigen processing to the global influenza CD4+ response was readily appreciated. The contribution of macroautophagy to the MHC class II-restricted response may vary depending upon the pathogen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6453-6463
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of virology
Volume85
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Influenza A virus
Autophagy
major histocompatibility complex
Major Histocompatibility Complex
antigens
influenza
Human Influenza
Antigen Presentation
Antigens
T-lymphocytes
endogenous sources
antigen-presenting cells
autophagy
T-Lymphocytes
proteasome endopeptidase complex
Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assay
lysosomes
dendritic cells
Orthomyxoviridae
Membrane Fusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

Cite this

Functional macroautophagy induction by influenza A virus without a contribution to major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted presentation. / Comber, Joseph D.; Robinson, Tara M.; Siciliano, Nicholas A.; Snook, Adam E.; Eisenlohr, Laurence C.

In: Journal of virology, Vol. 85, No. 13, 01.07.2011, p. 6453-6463.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Comber, Joseph D. ; Robinson, Tara M. ; Siciliano, Nicholas A. ; Snook, Adam E. ; Eisenlohr, Laurence C. / Functional macroautophagy induction by influenza A virus without a contribution to major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted presentation. In: Journal of virology. 2011 ; Vol. 85, No. 13. pp. 6453-6463.
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