Fruit and vegetable consumption and food values: National patterns in the United States by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program eligibility and cooking frequency

Julia A. Wolfson, Sara N. Bleich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

More frequent cooking at home may help improve diet quality and be associated with food values, particularly for individuals participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Objective: To examine patterns of fruit and vegetable consumption and food values among adults (aged 20 and older) in the United States, by SNAP participation and household cooking frequency. Methods: Analysis of cross-sectional 24-hour dietary recall data obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010 (N. =. 9560). Results: A lower percentage of SNAP participants consumed fruit (total: 35% vs. 46%, p. =. 0.001; fresh: 30% vs. 41%, p. <. 0.001) and vegetables (total: 49% vs. 58%, p. =. 0.004; fresh: 35% vs. 47%, p. <. 0.001) than those ineligible for SNAP. Among SNAP participants, cooking >. 6. times/week was associated with greater vegetable consumption compared to cooking <. 2. times/week (175. g vs. 98. g, p. =. 0.003). SNAP-eligible individuals who cooked ≥. 2. times/week were more to report price (medium cookers: 47% vs. 33%, p. =. 0.001; high cookers: 52% vs. 40%, p. <. 0.001), ease of preparation (medium cookers: 36% vs. 28%, p. =. 0.002; high cookers: 36% vs. 24%, p. <. 0.001) and how long food keeps (medium cookers: 57% vs. 45%, p. <. 0.001; high cookers: 61% vs. 50%, p. <. 0.001) as important compared to SNAP-ineligible individuals. Conclusions: Fruit and vegetable consumption in the United States is low regardless of cooking frequency. Efforts to improve diet quality should consider values on which food purchases are based.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume76
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Keywords

  • Adults
  • Cooking frequency
  • Diet quality
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Income status
  • SNAP

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Fruit and vegetable consumption and food values: National patterns in the United States by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program eligibility and cooking frequency'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this