Fructose

Incomplete intestinal absorption in humans

W. J. Ravich, Theodore M Bayless, M. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Fructose is an increasingly important commercial sweetener. However, some patients report abdominal symptoms after ingesting fructose-containing foods. The completeness of fructose absorption by the small intestine was assessed by breath hydrogen analysis in 16 healthy volunteers and incomplete absorption was defined as a peak rise in breath hydrogen of >20 parts per million. Fructose, 50 g as a 10% solution, was incompletely adsorbed in 6 of 16 subjects (37.5%). Incomplete absorption was associated with symptoms of cramps or diarrhea, or both, in 5 of these 6 individuals. Incomplete absorption was both concentration- and dose-related. Three subjects incompletely absorbed 37.5 g of fructose. In comparison, all 15 subjects who were studied after ingestion of sucrose, 50 g as a 10% solution, completely absorbed this sugar load. Incomplete absorption of fructose should be considered as a possible cause of gastrointestinal symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-29
Number of pages4
JournalGastroenterology
Volume84
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1983

Fingerprint

Intestinal Absorption
Fructose
Hydrogen
Sweetening Agents
Muscle Cramp
Small Intestine
Sucrose
Diarrhea
Healthy Volunteers
Eating
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Fructose : Incomplete intestinal absorption in humans. / Ravich, W. J.; Bayless, Theodore M; Thomas, M.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 84, No. 1, 1983, p. 26-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ravich, WJ, Bayless, TM & Thomas, M 1983, 'Fructose: Incomplete intestinal absorption in humans', Gastroenterology, vol. 84, no. 1, pp. 26-29.
Ravich, W. J. ; Bayless, Theodore M ; Thomas, M. / Fructose : Incomplete intestinal absorption in humans. In: Gastroenterology. 1983 ; Vol. 84, No. 1. pp. 26-29.
@article{6ff046ec837847ba976ca27dc4a96d64,
title = "Fructose: Incomplete intestinal absorption in humans",
abstract = "Fructose is an increasingly important commercial sweetener. However, some patients report abdominal symptoms after ingesting fructose-containing foods. The completeness of fructose absorption by the small intestine was assessed by breath hydrogen analysis in 16 healthy volunteers and incomplete absorption was defined as a peak rise in breath hydrogen of >20 parts per million. Fructose, 50 g as a 10{\%} solution, was incompletely adsorbed in 6 of 16 subjects (37.5{\%}). Incomplete absorption was associated with symptoms of cramps or diarrhea, or both, in 5 of these 6 individuals. Incomplete absorption was both concentration- and dose-related. Three subjects incompletely absorbed 37.5 g of fructose. In comparison, all 15 subjects who were studied after ingestion of sucrose, 50 g as a 10{\%} solution, completely absorbed this sugar load. Incomplete absorption of fructose should be considered as a possible cause of gastrointestinal symptoms.",
author = "Ravich, {W. J.} and Bayless, {Theodore M} and M. Thomas",
year = "1983",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "84",
pages = "26--29",
journal = "Gastroenterology",
issn = "0016-5085",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fructose

T2 - Incomplete intestinal absorption in humans

AU - Ravich, W. J.

AU - Bayless, Theodore M

AU - Thomas, M.

PY - 1983

Y1 - 1983

N2 - Fructose is an increasingly important commercial sweetener. However, some patients report abdominal symptoms after ingesting fructose-containing foods. The completeness of fructose absorption by the small intestine was assessed by breath hydrogen analysis in 16 healthy volunteers and incomplete absorption was defined as a peak rise in breath hydrogen of >20 parts per million. Fructose, 50 g as a 10% solution, was incompletely adsorbed in 6 of 16 subjects (37.5%). Incomplete absorption was associated with symptoms of cramps or diarrhea, or both, in 5 of these 6 individuals. Incomplete absorption was both concentration- and dose-related. Three subjects incompletely absorbed 37.5 g of fructose. In comparison, all 15 subjects who were studied after ingestion of sucrose, 50 g as a 10% solution, completely absorbed this sugar load. Incomplete absorption of fructose should be considered as a possible cause of gastrointestinal symptoms.

AB - Fructose is an increasingly important commercial sweetener. However, some patients report abdominal symptoms after ingesting fructose-containing foods. The completeness of fructose absorption by the small intestine was assessed by breath hydrogen analysis in 16 healthy volunteers and incomplete absorption was defined as a peak rise in breath hydrogen of >20 parts per million. Fructose, 50 g as a 10% solution, was incompletely adsorbed in 6 of 16 subjects (37.5%). Incomplete absorption was associated with symptoms of cramps or diarrhea, or both, in 5 of these 6 individuals. Incomplete absorption was both concentration- and dose-related. Three subjects incompletely absorbed 37.5 g of fructose. In comparison, all 15 subjects who were studied after ingestion of sucrose, 50 g as a 10% solution, completely absorbed this sugar load. Incomplete absorption of fructose should be considered as a possible cause of gastrointestinal symptoms.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0020656627&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0020656627&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 84

SP - 26

EP - 29

JO - Gastroenterology

JF - Gastroenterology

SN - 0016-5085

IS - 1

ER -