Frozen blastocyst embryo transfer using a supplemented natural cycle protocol has a similar live birth rate compared to a programmed cycle protocol

Ruth B. Lathi, Yueh Yun Chi, Jing Liu, Briana Saravanabavanandhan, Aparna Hegde, Valerie L. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare outcomes for a supplemented natural cycle with a programmed cycle protocol for frozen blastocyst transfer. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed of frozen autologous blastocyst transfers, at a single academic fertility center (519 supplemented natural cycles and 106 programmed cycles). Implantation, clinical pregnancy, miscarriage, and live birth and birth weight were compared using Pearson’s Chi-squared test, T-test, or Fisher’s exact test. Results: There was no significant difference between natural and programmed frozen embryo transfers with respect to implantation (21.9 vs. 18.1 %), clinical pregnancy (35.5 vs. 29.2 %), and live birth rates (27.7 vs. 23.6 %). Mean birth weights were also similar between natural and programmed cycles for singletons (3354 vs. 3340 g) and twins (2422 vs. 2294 g) Conclusion: Frozen blastocyst embryo transfers using supplemented natural or programmed protocols experience similar success rates. Patient preference should be considered in choosing a protocol.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1057-1062
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 13 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Frozen embryo transfer
  • Natural cycle
  • Pregnancy outcome
  • Programmed cycle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Genetics(clinical)

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