Frontal lobe nonconvulsive status epilepticus: A case of epileptic stuttering, aphemia, and aphasia-not a sign of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

Peter W Kaplan, Ryan Stagg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Stuttering is a repetitive, iterative disfluency of speech, and is usually seen as a developmental problem in childhood. Acquired causes in adults include strokes and medications. When stuttering occurs with seizure-like events, it is usually attributed to psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. We describe an elderly man who experienced personality change and bouts of stuttering, followed by anarthria with preserved writing and then aphasia affecting written and uttered language, and ending with confusion. EEG recordings showed nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) with focality in the left frontal region followed by bifrontal NCSE. This case enlarges our understanding of the behavioral correlates of focal frontal seizures to include simple partial seizures with speech and then language output disturbances (aphemia, then aphasia), progressing to complex partial phenomenology in the setting of frontal NCSE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-195
Number of pages5
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

Fingerprint

Stuttering
Status Epilepticus
Aphasia
Frontal Lobe
Seizures
Language
Confusion
Partial Epilepsy
Personality
Electroencephalography
Stroke

Keywords

  • Differential diagnosis
  • Frontal lobe status epilepticus
  • Language
  • Nonconvulsive status epilepticus
  • Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures
  • Seizures
  • Speech
  • Stuttering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

@article{c4493eeae9df4d59b70e737ba233077f,
title = "Frontal lobe nonconvulsive status epilepticus: A case of epileptic stuttering, aphemia, and aphasia-not a sign of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures",
abstract = "Stuttering is a repetitive, iterative disfluency of speech, and is usually seen as a developmental problem in childhood. Acquired causes in adults include strokes and medications. When stuttering occurs with seizure-like events, it is usually attributed to psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. We describe an elderly man who experienced personality change and bouts of stuttering, followed by anarthria with preserved writing and then aphasia affecting written and uttered language, and ending with confusion. EEG recordings showed nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) with focality in the left frontal region followed by bifrontal NCSE. This case enlarges our understanding of the behavioral correlates of focal frontal seizures to include simple partial seizures with speech and then language output disturbances (aphemia, then aphasia), progressing to complex partial phenomenology in the setting of frontal NCSE.",
keywords = "Differential diagnosis, Frontal lobe status epilepticus, Language, Nonconvulsive status epilepticus, Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, Seizures, Speech, Stuttering",
author = "Kaplan, {Peter W} and Ryan Stagg",
year = "2011",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.yebeh.2011.03.028",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "191--195",
journal = "Epilepsy and Behavior",
issn = "1525-5050",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Frontal lobe nonconvulsive status epilepticus

T2 - A case of epileptic stuttering, aphemia, and aphasia-not a sign of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

AU - Kaplan, Peter W

AU - Stagg, Ryan

PY - 2011/6

Y1 - 2011/6

N2 - Stuttering is a repetitive, iterative disfluency of speech, and is usually seen as a developmental problem in childhood. Acquired causes in adults include strokes and medications. When stuttering occurs with seizure-like events, it is usually attributed to psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. We describe an elderly man who experienced personality change and bouts of stuttering, followed by anarthria with preserved writing and then aphasia affecting written and uttered language, and ending with confusion. EEG recordings showed nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) with focality in the left frontal region followed by bifrontal NCSE. This case enlarges our understanding of the behavioral correlates of focal frontal seizures to include simple partial seizures with speech and then language output disturbances (aphemia, then aphasia), progressing to complex partial phenomenology in the setting of frontal NCSE.

AB - Stuttering is a repetitive, iterative disfluency of speech, and is usually seen as a developmental problem in childhood. Acquired causes in adults include strokes and medications. When stuttering occurs with seizure-like events, it is usually attributed to psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. We describe an elderly man who experienced personality change and bouts of stuttering, followed by anarthria with preserved writing and then aphasia affecting written and uttered language, and ending with confusion. EEG recordings showed nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) with focality in the left frontal region followed by bifrontal NCSE. This case enlarges our understanding of the behavioral correlates of focal frontal seizures to include simple partial seizures with speech and then language output disturbances (aphemia, then aphasia), progressing to complex partial phenomenology in the setting of frontal NCSE.

KW - Differential diagnosis

KW - Frontal lobe status epilepticus

KW - Language

KW - Nonconvulsive status epilepticus

KW - Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

KW - Seizures

KW - Speech

KW - Stuttering

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79958706110&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79958706110&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.yebeh.2011.03.028

DO - 10.1016/j.yebeh.2011.03.028

M3 - Article

C2 - 21543261

AN - SCOPUS:79958706110

VL - 21

SP - 191

EP - 195

JO - Epilepsy and Behavior

JF - Epilepsy and Behavior

SN - 1525-5050

IS - 2

ER -