From the exposome to mechanistic understanding of chemical-induced adverse effects

Beate I. Escher, Jörg Hackermüller, Tobias Polte, Stefan Scholz, Achim Aigner, Rolf Altenburger, Alexander Böhme, Stephanie K. Bopp, Werner Brack, Wibke Busch, Marc Chadeau-Hyam, Adrian Covaci, Adolf Eisenträger, James J. Galligan, Natalia Garcia-Reyero, Thomas Hartung, Michaela Hein, Gunda Herberth, Annika Jahnke, Jos Kleinjans & 16 others Nils Klüver, Martin Krauss, Marja Lamoree, Irina Lehmann, Till Luckenbach, Gary W. Miller, Andrea Müller, David H. Phillips, Thorsten Reemtsma, Ulrike Rolle-Kampczyk, Gerrit Schüürmann, Benno Schwikowski, Yu Mei Tan, Saskia Trump, Susanne Walter-Rohde, John F. Wambaugh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The exposome encompasses an individual's exposure to exogenous chemicals, as well as endogenous chemicals that are produced or altered in response to external stressors. While the exposome concept has been established for human health, its principles can be extended to include broader ecological issues. The assessment of exposure is tightly interlinked with hazard assessment. Here, we explore if mechanistic understanding of the causal links between exposure and adverse effects on human health and the environment can be improved by integrating the exposome approach with the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept that structures and organizes the sequence of biological events from an initial molecular interaction of a chemical with a biological target to an adverse outcome. Complementing exposome research with the AOP concept may facilitate a mechanistic understanding of stress-induced adverse effects, examine the relative contributions from various components of the exposome, determine the primary risk drivers in complex mixtures, and promote an integrative assessment of chemical risks for both human and environmental health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-106
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironment International
Volume99
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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hazard assessment
exposure
effect
chemical
human health
environmental health
chemical risk

Keywords

  • AOP
  • Exposome
  • Risk assessment
  • Systems biology
  • Systems chemistry
  • Systems toxicology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Escher, B. I., Hackermüller, J., Polte, T., Scholz, S., Aigner, A., Altenburger, R., ... Wambaugh, J. F. (2017). From the exposome to mechanistic understanding of chemical-induced adverse effects. Environment International, 99, 97-106. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2016.11.029

From the exposome to mechanistic understanding of chemical-induced adverse effects. / Escher, Beate I.; Hackermüller, Jörg; Polte, Tobias; Scholz, Stefan; Aigner, Achim; Altenburger, Rolf; Böhme, Alexander; Bopp, Stephanie K.; Brack, Werner; Busch, Wibke; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Covaci, Adrian; Eisenträger, Adolf; Galligan, James J.; Garcia-Reyero, Natalia; Hartung, Thomas; Hein, Michaela; Herberth, Gunda; Jahnke, Annika; Kleinjans, Jos; Klüver, Nils; Krauss, Martin; Lamoree, Marja; Lehmann, Irina; Luckenbach, Till; Miller, Gary W.; Müller, Andrea; Phillips, David H.; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Rolle-Kampczyk, Ulrike; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Schwikowski, Benno; Tan, Yu Mei; Trump, Saskia; Walter-Rohde, Susanne; Wambaugh, John F.

In: Environment International, Vol. 99, 01.02.2017, p. 97-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Escher, BI, Hackermüller, J, Polte, T, Scholz, S, Aigner, A, Altenburger, R, Böhme, A, Bopp, SK, Brack, W, Busch, W, Chadeau-Hyam, M, Covaci, A, Eisenträger, A, Galligan, JJ, Garcia-Reyero, N, Hartung, T, Hein, M, Herberth, G, Jahnke, A, Kleinjans, J, Klüver, N, Krauss, M, Lamoree, M, Lehmann, I, Luckenbach, T, Miller, GW, Müller, A, Phillips, DH, Reemtsma, T, Rolle-Kampczyk, U, Schüürmann, G, Schwikowski, B, Tan, YM, Trump, S, Walter-Rohde, S & Wambaugh, JF 2017, 'From the exposome to mechanistic understanding of chemical-induced adverse effects', Environment International, vol. 99, pp. 97-106. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2016.11.029
Escher BI, Hackermüller J, Polte T, Scholz S, Aigner A, Altenburger R et al. From the exposome to mechanistic understanding of chemical-induced adverse effects. Environment International. 2017 Feb 1;99:97-106. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2016.11.029
Escher, Beate I. ; Hackermüller, Jörg ; Polte, Tobias ; Scholz, Stefan ; Aigner, Achim ; Altenburger, Rolf ; Böhme, Alexander ; Bopp, Stephanie K. ; Brack, Werner ; Busch, Wibke ; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc ; Covaci, Adrian ; Eisenträger, Adolf ; Galligan, James J. ; Garcia-Reyero, Natalia ; Hartung, Thomas ; Hein, Michaela ; Herberth, Gunda ; Jahnke, Annika ; Kleinjans, Jos ; Klüver, Nils ; Krauss, Martin ; Lamoree, Marja ; Lehmann, Irina ; Luckenbach, Till ; Miller, Gary W. ; Müller, Andrea ; Phillips, David H. ; Reemtsma, Thorsten ; Rolle-Kampczyk, Ulrike ; Schüürmann, Gerrit ; Schwikowski, Benno ; Tan, Yu Mei ; Trump, Saskia ; Walter-Rohde, Susanne ; Wambaugh, John F. / From the exposome to mechanistic understanding of chemical-induced adverse effects. In: Environment International. 2017 ; Vol. 99. pp. 97-106.
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AU - Altenburger, Rolf

AU - Böhme, Alexander

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