From Graphemes to Abstract Letter Shapes: Levels of Representation in Written Spelling

Brenda C Rapp, Alfonso Caramazza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The letter substitution errors of 2 dysgraphic subjects who, despite relatively intact oral spelling, made well-formed letter substitution errors in written spelling, were studied. Many of these errors bear a general physical similarity to the intended target. Analyses revealed that this similarity apparently was based on the features of the component strokes of letters rather than on visuospatial characteristics. A comparison of these subjects' letter substitution errors with those of 2 other individuals with brain damage, whose damage was at a different level of processing, revealed that the latter subjects' errors are not explicable in terms of stroke-feature similarity. Strong support was found for the computation of multiple representational types in the course of written spelling. This system includes a relatively abstract, effector-independent representational level that specifies the features of the component strokes of letters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1130-1152
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume23
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 1997

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Stroke
Brain
Grapheme
Letters
Spelling
Substitution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

From Graphemes to Abstract Letter Shapes : Levels of Representation in Written Spelling. / Rapp, Brenda C; Caramazza, Alfonso.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Vol. 23, No. 4, 08.1997, p. 1130-1152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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