Fracture risk and spaceflight: mechanisms involved in microgravity-related calcium loss from bone

Jay Shapiro

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

Bone loss has been a significant problem for humans exposed to microgravity. Measurements taken during the 6 month flights of the Mir station show that loss occurs at a rate of 0.5-2%/month depending on the individual and the specific bone site (spine, proximal femur). Exercise regimens have not prevented bone loss, and the recovery of bone after return to earth's gravity can take approximately 2-3 times the exposure to weightlessness. Potential countermeasures to this problem and discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S-101
JournalAnnals of biomedical engineering
Volume28
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000
Externally publishedYes
Event2000 Annual Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society - Washington, WA, USA
Duration: Oct 12 2000Oct 14 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Fracture risk and spaceflight: mechanisms involved in microgravity-related calcium loss from bone'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this