Fourier domain pump-probe optical coherence tomography: Hemoglobin imaging at 830 nm

Brian E. Applegate, Desmond Jacob, Joseph A. Izatt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The detailed 3-D mapping of tissue microcirculation, including blood oxygen saturation and flow, would provide important biometrics needed to understand the cause and progression of numerous diseases. To that end we have started developing a two-color Fourier domain Pump-Probe Optical Coherence Tomography (PPOCT) system designed specifically to image hemoglobin with the eventual goal of measuring blood oxygen saturation. This system utilizes a two-color pump-probe scheme chosen to maximize the potential imaging depth by probing in the near IR where the tissue scattering properties are most favorable and pumping in the visible where the hemoglobin light absorption is most efficient. A sample consisting of pure hemoglobin placed between two coverslips has been used for the initial demonstration and to begin the process of optimizing the system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCoherence Domain Optical Methods and Optical Coherence Tomography in Biomedicine XII
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 21 2008
Externally publishedYes
EventCoherence Domain Optical Methods and Optical Coherence Tomography in Biomedicine XII - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 21 2008Jan 23 2008

Publication series

NameProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume6847
ISSN (Print)1605-7422

Other

OtherCoherence Domain Optical Methods and Optical Coherence Tomography in Biomedicine XII
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/21/081/23/08

Keywords

  • Molecular contrast
  • Molecular imaging
  • Nonlinear optics
  • Optical coherence tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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