Four independent mutations in the feline Fibroblast Growth Factor 5 gene determine the long-haired phenotype in domestic cats

James S. Kehler, Victor A. David, Alejandro A. Schäffer, Kristina Bajema, Eduardo Eizirik, David K. Ryugo, Steven S. Hannah, Stephen J. O'Brien, Marilyn Menotti-Raymond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To determine the genetic regulation of "hair length" in the domestic cat, a whole-genome scan was performed in a multigenerational pedigree in which the "long-haired" phenotype was segregating. The 2 markers that demonstrated the greatest linkage to the long-haired trait (log of the odds ≥ 6) flanked an estimated 10-Mb region on cat chromosome B1 containing the Fibroblast Growth Factor 5 (FGF5) gene, a candidate gene implicated in regulating hair follicle growth cycle in other species. Sequence analyses of FGF5 in 26 cat breeds and 2 pedigrees of nonbreed cats revealed 4 separate mutations predicted to disrupt the biological activity of the FGF5 protein. Pedigree analyses demonstrated that different combinations of paired mutant FGF5 alleles segregated with the long-haired phenotype in an autosomal recessive manner. Association analyses of more than 380 genotyped breed and nonbreed cats were consistent with mutations in the FGF5 gene causing the long-haired phenotype in an autosomal recessive manner. In combination, these genomic approaches demonstrated that FGF5 is the major genetic determinant of hair length in the domestic cat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)555-566
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Heredity
Volume98
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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