Form and function of the bacterial cytokinetic ring

Elizabeth L. Meier, Erin D Goley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Bacterial cytokinesis depends upon the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ, which polymerizes into an annular structure at midcell (the Z-ring) that defines the division site. The Z-ring nucleates assembly of downstream machinery required for cell wall synthesis and membrane fission, but may also generate constrictive force. Recent high-resolution imaging of FtsZ in vivo has begun to illuminate the organization of filaments within the Z-ring. This in vivo work has been complemented by reconstitution of Z-rings in vitro to demonstrate the force-generating capacity of FtsZ and explore its mechanism of action. Despite these technical advances, whether FtsZ-mediated force generation is required for cytokinesis and how Z-ring structure and constriction are mechanistically linked to cell wall remodeling are open questions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-27
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Opinion in Cell Biology
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Cytokinesis
Cell Wall
GTP Phosphohydrolases
Tubulin
Constriction
Cell Membrane
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Form and function of the bacterial cytokinetic ring. / Meier, Elizabeth L.; Goley, Erin D.

In: Current Opinion in Cell Biology, Vol. 26, No. 1, 02.2014, p. 19-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{779a9e15d7ce4843ac74b1fc4c36a8a5,
title = "Form and function of the bacterial cytokinetic ring",
abstract = "Bacterial cytokinesis depends upon the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ, which polymerizes into an annular structure at midcell (the Z-ring) that defines the division site. The Z-ring nucleates assembly of downstream machinery required for cell wall synthesis and membrane fission, but may also generate constrictive force. Recent high-resolution imaging of FtsZ in vivo has begun to illuminate the organization of filaments within the Z-ring. This in vivo work has been complemented by reconstitution of Z-rings in vitro to demonstrate the force-generating capacity of FtsZ and explore its mechanism of action. Despite these technical advances, whether FtsZ-mediated force generation is required for cytokinesis and how Z-ring structure and constriction are mechanistically linked to cell wall remodeling are open questions.",
author = "Meier, {Elizabeth L.} and Goley, {Erin D}",
year = "2014",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.ceb.2013.08.006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "19--27",
journal = "Current Opinion in Cell Biology",
issn = "0955-0674",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Form and function of the bacterial cytokinetic ring

AU - Meier, Elizabeth L.

AU - Goley, Erin D

PY - 2014/2

Y1 - 2014/2

N2 - Bacterial cytokinesis depends upon the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ, which polymerizes into an annular structure at midcell (the Z-ring) that defines the division site. The Z-ring nucleates assembly of downstream machinery required for cell wall synthesis and membrane fission, but may also generate constrictive force. Recent high-resolution imaging of FtsZ in vivo has begun to illuminate the organization of filaments within the Z-ring. This in vivo work has been complemented by reconstitution of Z-rings in vitro to demonstrate the force-generating capacity of FtsZ and explore its mechanism of action. Despite these technical advances, whether FtsZ-mediated force generation is required for cytokinesis and how Z-ring structure and constriction are mechanistically linked to cell wall remodeling are open questions.

AB - Bacterial cytokinesis depends upon the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ, which polymerizes into an annular structure at midcell (the Z-ring) that defines the division site. The Z-ring nucleates assembly of downstream machinery required for cell wall synthesis and membrane fission, but may also generate constrictive force. Recent high-resolution imaging of FtsZ in vivo has begun to illuminate the organization of filaments within the Z-ring. This in vivo work has been complemented by reconstitution of Z-rings in vitro to demonstrate the force-generating capacity of FtsZ and explore its mechanism of action. Despite these technical advances, whether FtsZ-mediated force generation is required for cytokinesis and how Z-ring structure and constriction are mechanistically linked to cell wall remodeling are open questions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84884572561&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84884572561&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ceb.2013.08.006

DO - 10.1016/j.ceb.2013.08.006

M3 - Article

C2 - 24529242

AN - SCOPUS:84884572561

VL - 26

SP - 19

EP - 27

JO - Current Opinion in Cell Biology

JF - Current Opinion in Cell Biology

SN - 0955-0674

IS - 1

ER -