For a theory of cognitive rehabilitation: Progress in the decade of the brain

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

A theory of cognitive rehabilitation should specify how change from a damaged state of cognitive processing can be modified into a normal, or more functional, state of cognitive processing. Such a theory should incorporate what is known about the cognitive representations and processes underlying normal cognition, how these are affected by brain damage, and how learning or modification of cognitive processing occurs. This chapter argues that development of a useful theory of cognitive rehabilitation requires integrating advances from cognitive neuropsychology, experimental psychology, computational neuroscience, and molecular biology of the brain, as well as empirical evidence from various branches of rehabilitation. It is likely that such a theory will specify how behavioral rehabilitation strategies can be augmented by pharmacological agents. A theory of cognitive rehabilitation should specify how change from a damaged state of cognitive processing can be modified into a normal, or more functional, state of cognitive processing. Such a theory should incorporate what is known about the cognitive representations and processes underlying normal cognition, how these are affected by brain damage, and how learning or modification of cognitive processing occurs. It is therefore argued that development of a useful theory of cognitive rehabilitation will require integrating advances from cognitive neuropsychology, experimental psychology, computational neuroscience, and molecular biology of the brain, as well as empirical evidence from various branches of rehabilitation. It is likely that such a theory will specify how behavioral rehabilitation strategies can be augmented by pharmacological agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Effectiveness of Rehabilitation for Cognitive Deficits
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Print)9780191689420, 0198526547, 9780198526544
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 22 2012

Fingerprint

Rehabilitation
Brain
Experimental Psychology
Neuropsychology
Neurosciences
Computational Biology
Cognition
Learning
Pharmacology

Keywords

  • Cognitive neuropsychology
  • Cognitive rehabilitation theory
  • Computational neuroscience
  • Experimental psychology
  • Molecular biology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

For a theory of cognitive rehabilitation : Progress in the decade of the brain. / Hillis-Trupe, Argye.

The Effectiveness of Rehabilitation for Cognitive Deficits. Oxford University Press, 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Hillis-Trupe, Argye. / For a theory of cognitive rehabilitation : Progress in the decade of the brain. The Effectiveness of Rehabilitation for Cognitive Deficits. Oxford University Press, 2012.
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