Footprints of the globe: A practical look at the mechanism of orbital blowout fractures, with a revisit to the work of Raymond Pfeiffer

Brian F. Erling, Nicholas Iliff, Bradley Robertson, Paul Manson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Multiple mechanisms of orbital blowout fractures have been proposed since the fracture was described at the beginning of this century. The original theory of direct globe-to-wall contact was abandoned long ago for the more contemporary hydraulic and bone conduction theories. Although the more widely accepted theories play an obvious role in fracture generation and its associated complications, it is our contention that direct globe-to-wall contact is an important and largely unrecognized mechanism in orbital blowout fracture production. By means of a critical review of the historical literature and an analysis of patient computed tomography scans, support is presented for the original theory first proposed by Raymond Pfeiffer in 1943.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1313-1319
Number of pages7
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume103
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1999

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Orbital Fractures
Bone Conduction
Tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Footprints of the globe : A practical look at the mechanism of orbital blowout fractures, with a revisit to the work of Raymond Pfeiffer. / Erling, Brian F.; Iliff, Nicholas; Robertson, Bradley; Manson, Paul.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 103, No. 4, 04.1999, p. 1313-1319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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