Food insecurity is associated with food-related psychosocial factors and behaviors among low-income African American adults in Baltimore city

Sonali Suratkar, Joel Gittelsohn, Hee Jung Song, Jean A. Anliker, Sangita Sharma, Megan Mattingly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Using a sample of 175 low-income urban African American adults, we examined the relationship between food insecurity and knowledge, self-efficacy, intentions, healthy and unhealthy food getting, and preparation. Food security was positively associated with employment, possession of health insurance, and residence in West Baltimore. Contrary to expectation, food insecure adults had greater healthy eating self-efficacy and got healthy foods more frequently than food secure respondents. However, they were also less likely to prepare foods using healthy cooking practices. Respondents with higher healthy eating intentions prepared food in healthful ways and acquired unhealthy foods less frequently. Efforts to improve the nutritional health of the food insecure population should focus on psychosocial factors and food-related behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-119
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Food assistance participation
  • Food insecurity
  • Food-related behaviors
  • Psychosocial
  • Self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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