Food acquisition practices used by Food-insecure individuals when they Are concerned about having sufficient food for themselves and their households

Andrea S. Anater, Rita Mcwilliams, Carl A. Latkin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Food-insecure individuals' food acquisition practices can result in inadequate nutrition, consumption of unsafe foods, and risky behaviors. A survey instrument was developed to collect sociodemographic information and frequency of engagement in different practices. After expert review, cognitive interviewing and pretesting, data were collected from 10 individuals/site at 50 emergency food providers. Descriptive analysis was performed and prevalence of each practice was ascertained for 3 time periods. Participants confirmed use of 78 practices with 50% using 19. Sixty-three percent posed a potential risk, including eating road kill, going to prison to obtain meals, and diluting foods (like baby formula) to extend them. Prevalence and riskiness of practices used by the food-insecure can inform policy and public health decisions regarding issues of food insecurity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-44
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Keywords

  • Coping behavior
  • Emergency food providers
  • Food acquisition practices
  • Food insecurity
  • Hunger
  • Policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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